Joe Quesada plays Marvel ‘Memento’ games with Comicsgate’s creation

Douglas Ernst Joe Quesada 2015

Something happened in the wee hours of the morning on Sunday, Sept. 9, 2018: Marvel’s Chief Creative Officer debated the existence of Comicsgate with the networks’s supposedly insignificant members. There was, however, some big problems with his performance: Mr. Quesada wanted to pretend as if he had anterograde amnesia straight out of Christopher Nolan’s Memento.

In short, the Marvel executive wanted to act as if your friendly neighborhood blogger wasn’t trying to warn him for years that the industry’s bad business practices would produce something akin to Comicsgate.

Joe Quesada tweets

Marvel’s personal boogeyman (i.e., Diversity & Comics), is supposedly the root of all that ails the industry. Spontaneous Comicsgate Combustion happened in late 2017 and a fire of bad behavior soured the relationship between creators and readers, if Marvel’s top brass is to be believed.

Wrong.

Memento GP

The fact of the matter is that Mr. Quesada and his peers had countless opportunities to right the ship. Myself and others (e.g., Dave Huber when he was writing at Colossus of Rhodey) gave Marvel a series of simple steps to avoid a large-scale consumer revolt.

We were ignored.

Regular readers know that I made the leap to YouTube with the assumption that I needed a bigger megaphone if I was ever going to help spearhead said consumer revolt.

What started on blogs eventually transformed into Comicsgate when myself, Capn Cummings, Diversity & Comics and a core group of others united behind the idea that we could create a parallel industry to “SJW Marvel Inc.”

The response by left-wing ideologues was to double down on unprofessional and immature antics — like Max “feast upon my a**” Bemis putting the “Uncle Ernst” villain into Moon Knight.

Moon Knight Ernst

Question: Did Mr. Quesada, who stayed up until about 5 a.m. EDT. talking about Comicsgate, dare to answer questions about Mr. Bemis’ lack of professionalism?

Answer: Not a chance. He stayed far, far away from me because he knows the facts are on my side and I would make him look like a buffoon.

Max Bemis Feast Upon My A

The good news about the industry’s decision to dig in its heels into a quicksand  pit of stupidity is that readers finally have other options. Indiegogo campaigns like Jawbreakers: Lost Souls have been wildly successful. The products will soon ship, and when that happens the paradigm will have officially shifted.

There is no turning back, and for that we can oddly enough thank guys like Mr. Quesada, Dan Slott, Mark Waid, Erik Larsen, Tom Brevoort, Alanna Smith, Max Bemis and a whole host of ideologues.

MB Sun2

If you want to learn more about Mr. Quesada’s faux short-term memory problems, then be sure to check out my latest YouTube video. As always, make sure to hit the like and subscribe button if the format is to your liking.

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Tom Brevoort mocks Marvel customers; evil worm casting backfires

Tom Brevoort mocks fans

Question: What happens when Marvel Executive Editor Tom Brevoort sees the success of the Jawbreakers: Lost Souls INDIEGOGO campaign and then decides to take out his anger on customers?

Answer: Mr. Brevoort likens readers to an evil worm while he’s in a blind rage, but it only comes across as projection. People know that he is such an angry man that he even uses Twitter to call his son an “entitled white a**hole.”

Ak yourself, dear reader, who is more of a worm: Comic book readers who think it’s gross to call Peter Parker’s “devil deal” a form of medicine, or the guy who airs his own family’s dirty laundry on Twitter for cheap “likes” by total strangers.

Tom Brevoort Twitter son tweet

If you want to know what Jawbreakers: Lost Souls has readers energized while Tom Brevoort only has people shaking their head disgust, then look no further than his Twitter feed.

Check out my latest YouTube video for the full story regarding Marvel’s meltdown, along with the growth of the Comicsgate/Save Comics community that lives rent free inside Mr. Brevoort’s head.

Comicsgate will not be ignored: ‘Jawbreakers: Lost Souls’ finds its audience

Jawbreakers Richard C. Meyer

Roughly two years ago this blog started seeing fewer updates due to my increased attention to YouTube. I loved the regular commenters and the discussions we had here on a wide range of issues, but at the same time I knew that I needed to devote serious time to YouTube if my plan of having a bigger impact on the comics industry was to be realized. I had to in many ways sacrifice something I loved in order to possibly obtain a greater good down the line.

Fast-forward to this week: The “Comicsgate” community turned out in full force in support of Richard C. Meyer’s, artist Jon Malin’s, and colorist Brett Smith’s INDIEGOGO campaign “Jawbreakers: Lost Souls.”

In short: They aimed to raise $5,000 and ended up with nearly $40K in one day.

Jawbreakers Indiegogo

Right now some readers are asking: “What the heck does this have to do with you, Doug?”

The Answer: Your friendly neighborhood blogger  has been working on YouTube and Twitter — along with MANY other men and women — for months to expose the myriad or reasons why the comics industry is in a tailspin.

Regular readers can remember our tussles with Marvel scribe Dan Slott. If you haven’t caught my work on YouTube, however, then you’ve been missing out on coverage of the fits and tantrums that industry creators are experiencing due to work by Mr. Meyer (aka, Diversity & Comics) Capn. Cummings, Just Some Guy, myself, Yellow Flash, That Umbrella Guy, Captain Frugal and others. All of us play different roles within the community, but the endgame is the same: We want comic books with solid artwork and sound storytelling devoid of petty politics.

If you want to see what I’ve been up to, then you can check out a nearly two-hour interview I had with Jon Malin on March 30 (embedding disabled or else I’d add it here).

Similarly, I put up a Jawbreakers: Lost Souls video last night and recently talked all-things Comicsgate with artist Timothy Lim and journalist Ian Miles Cheong. I’d love to hear your thoughts on each in the comments section below.

As always, if you like the content then make sure to subscribe over at YouTube for regular updates. There are some pretty cool announcements planned for later in the year.

Timothy Lim of My Hero Magademia joins myself and journalist Ian Miles Cheong.

Iron Man #593: Bendis dragged kicking and screaming to honor Tony Stark’s “Legacy”

Iron Man 593

It’s here — Marvel’s attempt to tackle the “Legacy” of Tony Stark, aka The Invincible Iron Man. There’s only one problem, my friends: Writer Brian Michael Michael Bendis really wanted to keep the main character dead (for all intents and purposes) for a long, long time. Those pesky fans got in Editor in Chief Axel Alonso’s way, and now everyone who wanted to crown Riri Williams “the” Iron Man must to pretend as if they’re not backtracking against their will.

My latest YouTube video covers The Search for Tony Stark: Part 1, although what’s really going on is a search for ways to placate Disney overlords while still undermining Tony Stark’s long-term credibility.

Give my latest “quick-take” on the situation a listen and then let me know what you think in the comments section below. And, as always, if the video format resonates with you then make sure to like and subscribe. I don’t always cross-post these days (I need an intern!), but I try to do so as time permits.

Marvel’s Tom Brevoort and ideologue pals blame “toxic” fans for comic woes; hypocrisy exposed on YouTube

Tom B toxic

Thoughts become words. Words become actions. Actions become habits. Habits become character, and character becomes destiny.

Therefore, it’s incredibly sad that Marvel’s Tom Brevoort and his activist friends make a habit of lying — to themselves, to fans, and anyone else who is willing to listen.

The House of Ideologues has attempted (and failed) for months to defame YouTube creators who are exposing its hypocrisy, and the latest effort involves blaming “toxic fandom.” It’s not going to work because, as my latest YouTube video demonstrates, the partisan propaganda spewed by Marvel’s writers and editors can always be juxtaposed with their laughable moral grandstanding.

As always, let me know what you think of the latest developments in the comments section below. If you like the format, make sure to subscribe for regular updates since I don’t always have time to cross-post onto the blog.

 

Marvel’s Northrop mess: Confused and spineless a sad combo

New York Comic Con 2017 is over, but the After Action Report for Marvel Comics will not be a good one. Retailers exploded on the company behind closed doors early on, and then an event with defense contractor Northrop Grumman was cancelled on Saturday.

Ask yourself this question, though: Why did the outrage brigade not seem to care that a Planned Parenthood panel was held at NYCC, but a comic book designed to promote STEM fields generated enough anger to make Marvel buckle?

Mine NYCC

Here’s the deal: I don’t want anything political at a convention that is supposed to be focused on superheroes, but if comic industry pros are going to celebrate abortion providers, then a handful of angry fans on Twitter shouldn’t be able to end a Marvel/Northop team-up.

Check out my latest YouTube video for the full rundown. I experimented with a new format today, so feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section below. I prefer scripted content whenever possible, but creating it can be very time consuming.

Heather Antos: Marvel’s manufactured milkshake drama for fragile tea cups

Those who follow the comic book industry witnessed a Marvel-wide “milkshake” meltdown over the weekend, which is emblematic of everything that is wrong with the company. The whole story is incredibly bizarre, but it boils down to this:

Gwenpool editor Heather Antos saw three tweets that she didn’t like over the weekend and decided that random insults are the equivalent of harassment.

Despite the fact that a random insult is not the same as harassment or a human rights violation, the industry’s writers and artists acted as if she had barely dodged an acid attack by Taliban thugs in Afghanistan. Marvel Editor Tom Brevoort put on his daddy pants to let her know that everything would all be okay; he then told her that tens-of-thousands of fans who are tired of partisan politics at the company are “racist turds.”

There is more to the story, but for that I suggest checking out my latest YouTube video. Also, I would like to thank Mr. Brevoort for his overreaction, which netted me scores of new YouTube subscribers and Twitter followers.

Fun fact: Guys like me are not “racist turds.” Every time you criticize us, people check out our work and realize, “Hey, this seems like a pretty nice dude. I want to hear more of what he has to say.”

My suggestion for Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso would be to concentrate on good stories instead of partisan hackery, but at this point I don’t see him listening to reason. Given that, I will continue to make videos as the House That Axel Alonso built implodes.

Editor’s Note: Twitter user GoodEggJoe sent me this image today, which I told him was pretty darn good and worthy of being included on a blog post. His work shows that there are numerous ways to put pressure on the comic industry’s activist-writers. One doesn’t need a blog or a YouTube channel to have their voice be heard.

GoodEggJoe

Marvel Fall Previews 2017: Lies, like Venom symbiote, envelop company

Anyone who has a job knows that you do not want to make a habit of over-promising and under-delivering with you boss. A person who does that too many times will soon find themselves in the unemployment line.

Marvel Comics under Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso, for some weird reason, does not seem to have learned that lesson. It’s almost like every person who was habitually fired for over-promising and under-delivering got together and managed to land top jobs at Marvel.

For example, take this week’s Marvel Previews 2017 issue. It was billed as evidence of an industry-changing event when, in reality, fans are getting more of the same. Cosmetic changes have been made that allow for a ‘Happy-Happy Joy-Joy press’ release, but everything that caused sales headaches for the company over the past year remains.

In short, Marvel is showing the world what happens when a company lives out so many lies that it no longer knows the value of telling the truth.

For more on the sad state of affairs that is Marvel Comics in 2017, check out my YouTube video below. As always, feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Secret Empire #3: Nick Spencer event is really his ‘Secret Lecture’

Marvel’s Secret Empire #3 came out this week, although at this point it really should be called Secret Lecture. As I have said before, writer Nick Spencer is an intelligent man who knows a thing or two about the technical aspects of storytelling. The problem, however, is that he uses his gig at Marvel as a psychiatrist’s couch and a college professor’s podium. He seems to care less about entertaining readers than he does about working out his own political issues and lecturing America for electing President Donald Trump.

There’s much more to say, but for that I invite you to check out my latest YouTube review. If the format is up your alley, then make sure to subscribe and leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

Secret Empire #1: Hydra-Verse and Marvel PR damage control in full swing

Marvel’s comics division has been taking it on the chin in terms of bad press for well over a year now, and the official kickoff to its latest event is no exception. This week saw the release of Secret Empire #1 and a tie-in issue for Free Comic Book Day, which theoretically should bring elicit smiles across the country. Wrong. In fact, the project is so controversial that Marvel had to put out a statement earlier this week asking fans to be patient (even though the story has been building for well over a year).

My latest Youtube review covers the good, the bad and the ugly of writer Nick Spencer’s reality-warping Hydra-Cap tale. And yes, on some level it is good — but the whole situation is a bit complicated.

Anyway, check out the review and let me know what you think in the comments section below. Also: If anyone knows YouTube’s exact rules for using music clips without getting copyright infringement strikes, then let me know — I don’t want to make a habit of joke-singing songs like “Patience” by Guns N’ Roses…