Iron Man #10: Bendis’ Ri-regime change symbolic of hostile Tony takeover

Question: When is regime change acceptable in the Marvel Universe?

Answer: When It’s a Ri-regime change written by Brian Michael Bendis, or a self-serving effort by Dan Slott’s version of Peter Parker.

Yes, dear reader, writer Brian Michael Bendis is ten issues into Invincible Iron Man and the book’s protagonist (note: It’s not Tony Stark), is toppling problematic regimes, declaring herself queen, and then issuing a number of demands that must be met before she steps down. Meanwhile, the so-called genius has never spent one second trying to find the men who killed her best friend and stepfather.

If you think this is downright strange, then fans of the book will inevitably called you a “raaaaaaaaacist.” We’re living in strange times, but if you’re like and want to chronicle this era for future comic book fans, then check out my latest YouTube review for the full rundown.

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Mister Miracle #1: Tom King’s gem for DC spotlights Marvel’s fall

It looks as though comic book fans have a frontrunner for the best story of the year: DC’s Mister Miracle, written by Tom King with art by Mitch Gerads.

If you want to know why DC is churning out successful projects like Rebirth, The Button, Metal — and know Mister Miracle — while Marvel is … turning Captain America into a Hydra goon, then all you have to do is look at each company’s business model — DC is consciously focusing on the craft of writing while Marvel embraces partisan politics.

If you want to see how to save the comics industry, then pick up a copy of Mister Miracle #1. Companies that think big and shoot for the starts will be rewarded. Companies that pander to partisan activists while demonizing fans, in the long-run, will be punished. It’s really that simple.

Marvel’s Slotto Blocktavius melds with Judge Dredd, hurts sales and industry

It was just one year ago that I made the leap to YouTube and began a channel with the intention of providing honest reviews of comic books and the industry at large. I met up with a small group of individuals who sought to counter the Marvel-approved content that was published by mainstream websites, and before long we started to gain traction.

I knew it was only a matter of time before our collective efforts struck a nerve, and July seemed to be the first of many industry-wide screams by its ideologues.

My latest YouTube review covers the reaction by Dan Slott of The Amazing Spider-Man to guys like Diversity & Comics and Captain Cummings. His obsessive blocking of fans and critics on social media has even earned him a new nickname: Slotto Octavius.

Tune in for all the details on Slotto Octavius, the decision to liken his efforts to Judge Dredd, and the Twitter hashtag #BlockedByDanSlott. As always, feel free to sound off in the comments section below. I’m always eager to hear what you have to say.

Editor’s Note: I’d like to say a big thanks to Mr. Dystopian for the artistic compliment below!

Douglas Ernst Fan Art

Marvel’s Stephen Wacker weirdly claims victory over stated enemy — people who buy comics

Many years from now there will be business courses on Marvel Comics’ bizarre decision to demonize large swathes of its fanbase as a means of securing sales. Common sense tells objective observers that Marvel’s downward sales trajectory is tied to hostility towards the fans, and yet guys like Stephen Wacker, VP for Current Series and Development, continue to double and triple down on insulting loyal customers.

As has been said before, the “House of Ideas” has become the “House of Ideologues,” but if you need further evidence then check out my latest YouTube video. Mr. Wacker declared victory over the fans in a war that he has cooked up in his own mind, but he did so while preemptively blocking yours truly on Twitter.

Indeed, I am so utter defeated by men like Stephen Wacker and the Marvel’s Gate cult that I must be blocked from seeing what the victor is up to on social media. Never mind the fact that I have never made contact with him on the platform, either directly or indirectly.

Anyway, check out the video, subscribe if the format is up your alley, and make sure to leave your two cents in the comments section below. Unlike Mr. Wacker, I want to hear what you have to say.

Heather Antos: Marvel’s manufactured milkshake drama for fragile tea cups

Those who follow the comic book industry witnessed a Marvel-wide “milkshake” meltdown over the weekend, which is emblematic of everything that is wrong with the company. The whole story is incredibly bizarre, but it boils down to this:

Gwenpool editor Heather Antos saw three tweets that she didn’t like over the weekend and decided that random insults are the equivalent of harassment.

Despite the fact that a random insult is not the same as harassment or a human rights violation, the industry’s writers and artists acted as if she had barely dodged an acid attack by Taliban thugs in Afghanistan. Marvel Editor Tom Brevoort put on his daddy pants to let her know that everything would all be okay; he then told her that tens-of-thousands of fans who are tired of partisan politics at the company are “racist turds.”

There is more to the story, but for that I suggest checking out my latest YouTube video. Also, I would like to thank Mr. Brevoort for his overreaction, which netted me scores of new YouTube subscribers and Twitter followers.

Fun fact: Guys like me are not “racist turds.” Every time you criticize us, people check out our work and realize, “Hey, this seems like a pretty nice dude. I want to hear more of what he has to say.”

My suggestion for Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso would be to concentrate on good stories instead of partisan hackery, but at this point I don’t see him listening to reason. Given that, I will continue to make videos as the House That Axel Alonso built implodes.

Editor’s Note: Twitter user GoodEggJoe sent me this image today, which I told him was pretty darn good and worthy of being included on a blog post. His work shows that there are numerous ways to put pressure on the comic industry’s activist-writers. One doesn’t need a blog or a YouTube channel to have their voice be heard.

GoodEggJoe

Kaare Andrews, Marvel’s iron-fisted censorship goon, is ‘SJW 4 Life’ in SJW-13 gang

There used to be a great show called Get Smart that aired in the 1960s. I used to watch reruns as a kid, and I think it’s safe to say that I had a crush Barbara Feldon… Regardless, there was a running joke where the main character, a spy named Max, would attempt to use “the cone of silence” with his boss. It never worked, and they had to abandon the device to just talk to each other like normal people.

The point of this tale is that writers and artists at Marvel Comics want their own “Cone of Silence,” and they will go to great lengths to create it. This cone requires censoring voices that don’t agree with their partisan politics, and doing so in petty ways.

Check out my latest YouTube video for the full rundown, and as always let me know what you think in the comments section below.

Editor’s Note: Regular readers may also smile when they receive a blast from the past regarding writer Dan Slott’s weird threats of legal action against me over at ComicVine.

‘Peter Parker: The Chiptacular Zdarsky-Man’ more clown than hero

There was a time not too long ago when I was excited about Chip Zdarsky’s take on everyone’s favorite wall-crawler. Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man gave fans hope that Marvel would get back to basics and away from Peter Parker: The Not so Spectacular Tony Stark Clone.

Sadly, it appears as though Mr. Zdarsky’s take on Spider-Man continues Marvel’s obsession with turning the character into an immature man-boy. The superhero is most certainly a funny guy, but he isn’t a total goofball.

Readers should never wonder if Peter Parker was bitten by a radioactive clown instead of a radioactive spider, but that is unfortunately the case with PPSSM #2.

Check out my latest YouTube video for a more extensive run-down, and be sure to subscribe if you enjoy the video format.

Editor’s Note: A YouTube subscriber asked me to share this image on the blog for future reference. Critics often say that guys like me are imagining things when we say Marvel writers and editors use the books to push an agenda. 

Spectacular SpiderMan 2

Marvel’s ‘America’ tries to ‘slay the patriarchy,’ kills last bits of Axel Alonso’s credibility

The past couple of years have been rough for Marvel Editor in Chief Axel Alonso. People got sick and tired of having partisan politics jammed down their throats, and as a result they withheld their cash. DC Rebirth showed the world that sound storytelling has the strange ability to win over people who like … sound storytelling, but that hasn’t changed Mr. Alonso’s mode of operation.

Exhibit: Z-971 is America #5, by Gabby Rivera. Instead of “Ask Me About My Feminist Agenda” covers, Marvel now has its characters talking about ways to “slay the patriarchy.” Each month this book brings forth new and unexpected ways to add to its badness. It seems as though this book inspires a never-ending string of creative missteps, and for that reason it will be chronicled.

Behold! One of the ill-conceived Marvel comics is before us, dear reader. Check out my new YouTube review of the title and then let me know what you think in the comments section below. And, as always, if you enjoy the format then make sure to subscribe for regular updates.

Amazing Spider-Man #29: Dan Slott’s infantile hero needs Mommy Marconi

Question: What happens when a comic book has strong art, strikes the right tone and nails the pacing, but the author’s fundamental understanding of the main character is flawed?

Answer: The world gets something along the lines of The Amazing Spider-Man #29, Marvel’s Secret Empire tie-in featuring the collapse of Parker Industries.

As this blog has demonstrated for years, writer Dan Slott often emasculates Peter Parker as a means of elevating female characters (some created by the author) in his sphere of influence. ASM #29 further solidifies that case, as the hero — an intelligent grown man — is treated like an irresponsible teenager by Anna Maria Marconi. She, another near-perfect woman in his life, scowls and wags her finger at him like an overbearing mother. She sparks epiphanies that he — an intelligent grown man — should have realized on his own months ago.

A Homer Simpson-ized version of Peter Parker also appears in scenes with the villain,  Doctor Octopus, but for more on that I will direct you to my latest YouTube video.

As always, I’m interested in hearing your thoughts in the comments section below.

‘Dark Days: The Forge’ proves why DC is a cut above Marvel

The Forge Dark Days

The past year or so has seen the classic “DC vs. Marvel” debate take on added significance due to the success of DC Rebirth and the faltering (to put it lightly) of Marvel under the tenure of Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso. There are many reasons for Marvel’s failures, but DC’s Dark Days: The Forge #1 shines a giant Bat-Signal spotlight on one of them.

The bottom line is that DC, whether it’s something like The Button or Dark Days: The Forge, is telling good old-fashioned “yarns” because it’s actually concentrating on big ideas — namely the issue of Good vs. Evil.

The Forge #1 is a tale that revolves around two beings — one of goodness and light, the other of darkness and evil — who are granted immortality via a mysterious metal and then tasked to fight each other in cycles of reincarnation. Batman’s discovery of the metal prompted a years-long investigation into its origin, which led him down a dangerous rabbit hole. It’s one that no man — even Bruce Wayne — should explore.

What separates modern DC from Marvel is that the former is willing to explore ideas of good and evil in serious ways. If you pick up most Marvel comics, then what you’ll find is moral relativist heroes fighting each other over a catty disagreements; and heroes fighting villains in a “going through the motions” manner because that’s what they’ve always done; political allegories that primarily use characters as vehicles to vent anger at [insert politician here].”

Out of all the comics I’ve read over the past two years, I think only Charles Soule’s Daredevil confronted a character described as truly “evil.” When most Marvel heroes talk about good and evil, they do so in ironic Deadpool-speak.

Paraphrase [insert hero here]: “Do you think we’ll come out of this one alive? Of course we will — we’re the good guys!”

People who believe good and evil are real — not just artificial constructs in a godless universe — typically do not become jaded. If you believe that your life has meaning and is intrinsically good, then you are not prone to hold life in contempt.

DC appears to have enough writers and editors on its staff who understand this, who are genuinely inquisitive about big issues, and then willing to appropriately use their iconic stable of characters to explore them.

Marvel, on the other hand, appears to be populated with a cloister of bitter moral relativists who write books for a small population of philosophical malcontents. Then, when their screeds don’t sell, they rhetorically lash out at fans for not being embracing Mighty Marvel Pessimism Pods.

I don’t know too much about Dan DiDio, but I do know quality work when I see it. I got into DC in a significant way for the first time in my life this year, and I don’t plan on leaving anytime soon as long as I keep getting books like The Button and Dark Days: The Forge.

Kudos to DC’s creative team for a job well done.

Editor’s Note: I’ll be reviewing Dark Days: The  Forge #1 on my YouTube channel soon. If you haven’t already subscribed, then please do. I don’t always have time to transfer the videos over to WordPress as quickly as I’d prefer.