Comicsgate will not be ignored: ‘Jawbreakers: Lost Souls’ finds its audience

Jawbreakers Richard C. Meyer

Roughly two years ago this blog started seeing fewer updates due to my increased attention to YouTube. I loved the regular commenters and the discussions we had here on a wide range of issues, but at the same time I knew that I needed to devote serious time to YouTube if my plan of having a bigger impact on the comics industry was to be realized. I had to in many ways sacrifice something I loved in order to possibly obtain a greater good down the line.

Fast-forward to this week: The “Comicsgate” community turned out in full force in support of Richard C. Meyer’s, artist Jon Malin’s, and colorist Brett Smith’s INDIEGOGO campaign “Jawbreakers: Lost Souls.”

In short: They aimed to raise $5,000 and ended up with nearly $40K in one day.

Jawbreakers Indiegogo

Right now some readers are asking: “What the heck does this have to do with you, Doug?”

The Answer: Your friendly neighborhood blogger  has been working on YouTube and Twitter — along with MANY other men and women — for months to expose the myriad or reasons why the comics industry is in a tailspin.

Regular readers can remember our tussles with Marvel scribe Dan Slott. If you haven’t caught my work on YouTube, however, then you’ve been missing out on coverage of the fits and tantrums that industry creators are experiencing due to work by Mr. Meyer (aka, Diversity & Comics) Capn. Cummings, Just Some Guy, myself, Yellow Flash, That Umbrella Guy, Captain Frugal and others. All of us play different roles within the community, but the endgame is the same: We want comic books with solid artwork and sound storytelling devoid of petty politics.

If you want to see what I’ve been up to, then you can check out a nearly two-hour interview I had with Jon Malin on March 30 (embedding disabled or else I’d add it here).

Similarly, I put up a Jawbreakers: Lost Souls video last night and recently talked all-things Comicsgate with artist Timothy Lim and journalist Ian Miles Cheong. I’d love to hear your thoughts on each in the comments section below.

As always, if you like the content then make sure to subscribe over at YouTube for regular updates. There are some pretty cool announcements planned for later in the year.

Timothy Lim of My Hero Magademia joins myself and journalist Ian Miles Cheong.

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Captain America #699: Marvel writer Mark Waid is ‘King Baby,’ aka Trump

Mark Waid Captain America

Regular readers of Marvel Comics know all too well that its writers have been obsessed with Donald Trump since his primary campaign. Twitter rants coincided with weird editorial decisions (e.g., turning the man into an alternative-universe M.O.D.O.K.), and writer Nick Spencer used multiple books — including the Secret Empire event — to throw political tantrums.

Marvel scribe Mark Waid, however, has taken the industry’s Trump Derangement Syndrome to a whole new level for the company’s “Legacy” run. Captain America #699 is a fascinating read for all the wrong reasons.

Yes, it is boring. Yes, it is predictable. Yes, it comes across as if it were written by a freshman college student who just completed his first semester of political sciences classes.

What makes Captain America: Out of Time it interesting, however, is the psychology behind it all. Mr. Waid does not seem to even realize that all of his irrational fears regarding the president are rooted in his own ideological extremism. He fears Mr. Trump because he sees much of himself in the man.

Mr. Waid is, whether he wants to admit it or not, eerily similar to the villain referred to as “King Baby,” aka Donald Trump. Check out my latest YouTube video for the full rundown, and as always feel free to share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Dan Slott, ‘SJW Comics Tribe’ peers terrified of #MoveTheNeedle, Diversity & Comics

Your friendly neighborhood blogger has been away for awhile, but I’m back — and with good reason. The #Comicsgate community continues to grow, dear reader, and left-wing ideologues like Marvel’s Dan Slott are terrified.

For those who haven’t been paying attention, a YouTube community of men and women who want sound storytelling formed in 2017. “Comicsgate” flexed its muscles, and in the end (with help from vocal retailers and fans who voted with their wallets), Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso was shown the door. Books that should have been canned long ago were finally put out of their misery.

The past few days has seen the explosion of #MoveTheNeedle, which utilizes Twitter to show insiders just how much money the Comicsgate community spends on superhero fare.

Note: It’s a lot.

Week after week we are figuring out new ways to grow our channels and better disseminate the message. Diversity & Comics is a bigger boogeyman than ever before (Dan Slott refuses to even speak or write his name).

In short, the fight for comics culture is white-hot in 2018 and shows no signs of cooling off.

Check out my latest YouTube video for an extensive rundown of Hulk Hogan Wannabe Dan Slott, along with the desperate behavior of his ideologue peers.

 

Dan Slott writing Iron Man: Will Tony Stark be wearing ‘Ask Me About My Feminist Agenda’ armor?

Tony Stark

The universe works in mysterious ways.

Those who have followed this blog for years know that two Marvel characters hold a special place in my heart: Peter Parker (The Amazing Spider-Man), and Tony Stark (The Invincible Iron Man).

Those who have followed this blog for years know also know that your friendly neighborhood blogger has a unique relationship with Marvel scribe Dan Slott — I was writing reviews that had him rage-reading and rage-tweeting years before making the leap to YouTube.

Given this history, I thought we would both go our separate ways with the announcement that he was exiting The Amazing Spider-Man. He may have put Peter Parker into an “Ask Me About My Feminist Agenda” t-shirt, but that was in no way going to prompt me to follow his work on some random character.

The universe, my friends, had other plans!

Watch my latest YouTube video for a preview for what is to come in the years ahead as Dan continues to write for Marvel and I continue to review his work (always, mind you, with the goal of making him a better writer).

Marvel’s Iceman: Sina Grace’s failure explained

Iceman Marvel Sina Grace

It was just three years ago that Marvel Comics decided to ignore decades of continuity and turn Bobby Drake, aka Iceman, gay. Fans ridiculed writer Brian Michael Bendis’ decision, but little did they know that things would get much worse when the character was handed over to Sina Grace.

There are many examples of “SJW Marvel” fare for comic historians to study in the years ahead, but Mr. Grace’s are particularly illustrative. Most readers are okay with a hero who just so happens to be gay, but they will balk when a character is almost solely defined by his sexuality while occasionally — almost by accident — doing something heroic.

Mr. Grace provided activism masquerading as escapism for months, and fans knew it from the get-go. People gave Iceman the cold shoulder (no pun intended) for good reason, and his response was to blame the character.

Wrong answer.

Check out my latest YouTube video to see why Iceman failed to resonate with comic book fans.

Last Jedi: Rian Johnson’s middle finger chin scratch to confident men

The Force is Female Kathleen Kennedy

One of the cool things about YouTube is that you never know when a video is going to hit a nerve. I recently saw Star Wars: The Last Jedi, and then posted my review. The post racked up over 50,000 views and roughly 2,000 comments in one week.

Here’s the abridged version for those who are in a hurry: Director Rian Johnson has given generations of fans a giant “middle finger chin scratch.”

If you want to see male characters get emasculated in a $200 million commercial for producer Kathleen “The Force is Female” Kennedy’s political agenda, then see it soon.

If, however, you want to see a product that honor’s George Lucas’ original trilogy, then you should avoid Last Jedi at all costs.

Below are my latest YouTube uploads on the movie, although you can head on over to Conservative Book Club if you want a more traditional review.

NOTE: There are SPOILERS in all of my videos. You have been warned.

Next up is my video titled: “Last Jedi: ‘Milking’ Luke, ‘leaking’ Fozzi Finn not in trailers for a reason.

Finally we have my two-hour live-stream on “sellout critics, spin doctors and more.”

Remember: Star Wars: The Last Jedi apologists say this guy has no agenda…

Rian Johnson Feminist Agenda

Ernst & Van Sciver: Hanging out like Nelson & Murdock

Many years ago this blog used to cover the intersection of politics and popular culture, but for a number of reasons comic books seldom came up. If a reader told me eight years ago that I would one day be doing YouTube broadcasts with artists like Ethan Van Sciver, then I would have responded, “Hmmm. Are you sure? That’s cool…but I don’t know how it’s going to happen.” 

The universe is a weird and wonderful place, and as it turns out I did recently chat on Planet YouTube with one of the industry’s best artists. We hung out like we were Foggy Nelson and Matt Murdock after a long day at the law firm — and it was a blast.

Check out my latest live-stream below and then feel free to share your feedback in the comments section below. As always, be sure to subscribe if the video format is up your alley. I don’t always have the time to cross-post like I used to, so a lot of content goes straight to YouTube without ending up here (I’ll try to get better about that going forward).

Max Bemis of Moon Knight represents Marvel by telling fans: ‘I f***ing hate you’

Comic book fans know that Marvel Editor in Chief C.B. Cebulski has a slew of problems to deal with as he gets settled in his new job. Some issues are more complex than others. He will need to wisely pick and choose his battles.

One issue, however, that can be dealt with over night is the behavior of writers like Max “I f***ing you hate personally” Bemis.

Every normal company has a social media policy. Every normal company would fire an employ who told paying customers “I f***ing hate you.” Therefore, it makes absolutely no sense why Disney and Marvel turn a blind eye to the behavior of Mr. Bemis of Moon Knight.

Check out my new YouTube video for a rundown of the latest unprofessional turn by a Marvel writer. Feel free to contact Mr. Cebulski and Disney with screenshots of Mr. Bemis’ Twitter feed. Some of us would love to hear them explain how, exactly, this promotes the industry.

 

Dan Slott, Marvel’s impotent ideologue, needs big brother Nicieza to fight battles

Imagine a moment in time where Marvel writer Dan Slott was interacting with a friend — perhaps someone of Jewish or Islamic faith — and he said that not even King David or Allah could convince him of the following: Former President Obama failed the American people.

Got it? Now imagine that yours truly made a joke about said left-wing ideologue, which required me to call the religious figures mentioned a “cuck.”

Question: How would Dan Slott react to my joke?

May conservative guys like myself make fun of Jewish and Islamic ideologues of a left-wing persuasion, or is there are hypocritical double standard?

Can I make fun of Muslim left-wing ideologues with the same ease displayed by Dan Slott’s feminist crush as she refers to Jesus Christ as a “cuck”?

You tell me, dear reader. Let me know what you think, and then watch my latest YouTube video. I think you’ll find Mr. Slott’s latest attack on your friendly neighborhood blogger quite telling.

Thor Ragnarok: Chris Hemsworth parodies Chris Hemsworth playing Thor

There will come a time many years from now when film historians will analyze Marvel Studios, and some of them will rightfully conclude that Thor: Ragnarok won over critics and fans despite its forgettable script. Producers gave the world a $180 million stick of cinematic bubble gum and the world cheered.

Once upon a time, superhero fans watched Thor movies in which actor Chris Hemsworth and his supporting cast attempted to channel literary classics like Beowulf. Director Kenneth Branagh infused Thor (2011) with tinctures of Shakespearean tragedy, while Alan Taylor churned out similar work on Thor: The Dark World (2013).

All that is over with the arrival of director Taika Waititi, who has the first “family-friendly” Marvel Studios/Disney movie that drops an “orgy” reference into a scene involving the cosmic equivalent of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein’s infamous “Lolita Express.”

Thor: Ragnarok is essentially two movies mashed into one. Half of Ragnarok involves a ancient prophecy in which Asgard is captured by Thor’s sister Hela (Cate Blanchett) and ultimately destroyed by a giant demon named Sutur; the other half deals with an exiled Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) fighting as a gladiator on a planet ruled by Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum). The god of thunder and his brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) end up stranded on the planet as well, but they soon find a way to escape through “The Devil’s Anus.”

The two brothers are helped along the way by a disillusioned Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson), and the whole thing is tied together by a series of jokes that often follow (i.e., undermine) dramatic scenes.

In short, Ragnarok is a film that doesn’t take itself seriously — even as it sometimes asks the audience to do so. It is a movie that is seemingly so terrified of being parodied at the MTV Movie Awards that it decided to deny them the opportunity. Chris Hemsworth, at times, seems as though he’s parodying himself playing Thor. Potential moviegoers simply need to imagine a Batman movie in which the actor was required to alternately channel Joel Schumacher’s notorious Batman Forever (1985) and Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight (2008).

“Even when you had two eyes, you still only see half the picture,” Odin (Anthony Hopkins) says to Thor during a near-death experience. “Are you ‘Thor, the god of hammers’? Hmmm? That hammer is to help you control your power — focus it. It’s not your source of strength. […] Asgard is not a place, never was. This could be Asgard. Asgard is where our people stand. Even now — right now — those people need your help.”

“I’m not as strong as you,” Thor replies.

“No. You’re stronger,” says Odin.

The exchange is meant to be poignant, but it comes after nearly two hours of improv and slapstick comedy — it’s hard to appreciate Hopkins’ turn as Odin when the audience is still wondering how a thinly veiled masturbation joke involving Thor’s hammer made it into the finished product.

The question that fans of the genre need to ask themselves after the joke-a-minute Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2 and now Ragnarok is this: If a superhero movie struggles not to inject a gag of some kind into every heartfelt moment, then what does it say about the audience? What does it say about our culture?

If you’re looking for a Marvel movie that most closely resembles Ace Ventura: Pet Detective (1994), then run out an see Ragnarok before it leaves theaters. If you expect your god of thunder to possess a Game of Thrones gravitas, then stay far away.

Editor’s note: Check out my “Thor: Ragnaflop?” live-stream if you want to hear almost two hours of Thor-talk.