’13 Hours’: Michael Bay does Benghazi victims justice

John Krasinski 13 Hours

I have never seen a single Transformers movie because Michael Bay movies irritate me that much. The fact that I saw 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi should tell readers how much the coverup of the September 11, 2012, terror attack in Benghazi, Libya, means to me. In short, Mr. Bay proved to the world that it is possible for him to direct a movie that is worthy of box office success and critical praise.

13 Hours

Ambassador Christopher Stevens, foreign service officer Sean Smith, and CIA contractors Glen Doherty and Tyrone Woods died four years ago in Benghazi and then the government tried to cover it up. President Obama and then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton tried to blame what happened on an obscure video. The man who made that video was arrested and sat in jail in a scenario straight out of NBC’s “The Blacklist” — only it was real.

If it wasn’t for Michael Bay, the world would only have denial after denial after denial by the people who set the stage for bad things to happen and then watched while good men died. Bay uses Navy SEAL Jack Silva, played by John Krasinski, to tell the tale. The verdict is in: The guy from “The Office” does not disappoint.

13 Hours trailer

The fortunate thing for Bay is that like Lone Survivor or similar tales, 13 Hours does not need much character development. Bay’s stock in trade is action, so as long as the audience believes Krasinski and his crew are special operators, the heavy lifting has been accomplished.

The audience wants to see these men come face-to-face with death. The audience wants to feel what it’s like on the modern battlefield. The audience wants to hear all the sights and the sounds that Ambassador Stevens experienced in his last horrifying moments, and on every level Bay delivers.

Perhaps the most haunting part of 13 Hours was the a drone circled overhead while wave after wave of Islamic terrorists destroyed Stevens’ diplomatic compound and then attempted to do the same to a nearby CIA annex.

I explained it to my wife like this: Imagine you’re in the middle of the ocean on a giant ship and you fall overboard with only a small life preserver. You look up at the ship and yell for help at a man who stands over you with his arms crossed — but he says nothing.

Then sharks begin to circle and you yell some more — but he remains silent.

Then the sharks start bumping your legs under the water and you kick and thrash and scream — but the man refuses to move.

You are cut and bruised and broken and you barely survive the whole ordeal when, miraculously, another boat comes by and aids in your rescue.

When you go home and tell reporters what happen the man finally speaks, but he provides an entirely different account of your fight with the sharks. Millions of people believe the man did everything in his power to help you, and when he tells them to forget about your testimony they dutifully obey.

Michael Bay’s decision to bring 13 Hours to the big screen was a godsend for anyone who cares about the truth. Orwellian agents of the government will continue to try and revise history, but 13 Hours now exists and will make their job exponentially harder.

If you liked Lone Survivor and even movies like Blackhawk Down, then you should really see 13 Hours during its theatrical release.

Take a bow, Michael Bay. You earned it.

Editor’s Note: Yours truly will now begin reviewing movies for Conservative Book Club. I gave them a different review for 13 Hours that you can check out here.

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‘Godzilla’: The worst movie that everyone seems to love — for two cool fight scenes

Godzilla

‘Godzilla’ is a bad movie. Yes, the big green guy does have about 15 amazing minutes of screen time, which somehow managed to convince critics and audience members to give it a thumbs up — but make no mistake — ‘Godzilla’ is largely forgettable. Aside from a few gorgeous shots (e.g., the parachutists jumping into San Francisco with red flares) most people won’t recall much about the film six months from now. It’s definitely not worth paying $11 per adult ticket unless you’re a Baby Boomer who is nostalgic for that time when you could see a ‘Godzilla’ flick for 10 cents.

Godzilla Rotten TomatoesLet us examine the evidence by first starting with Bryan Cranston, who plays Joe Brody (A hat tip to ‘Jaws’?). Mr. Cranston is the only actor in a  movie, which wants you to care about the characters, who was any good. The problem: Joe Brody dies about 20 minutes into the movie. (Note: It took roughly an hour and a half for Godzilla to appear.)

 

Bryan Cranston Brody Godzilla
“I’m screaming because I’m the only actor who did a decent job in this entire movie and they killed me off at the very beginning! Arrrrrrg!”

That brings us to Aaron Taylor-Johnson as Ford Brody, who goes through the entire movie with a bewildered look on his face. We’re supposed to care about him, but we know nothing about him. It’s established (for about two minutes) that he’s in the Navy and he’s a father who loves his wife and kid. When Ford’s own father dies he calls his wife and says (I’m paraphrasing, but not by much): “Dad died. I’ll tell you about it later. I gotta go. Bye,” and hangs up.

Why should the audience give one rip about him? Why should they care about his wife? Why should they care about his kid? The answer: because this is a military family. Sorry director Gareth Edwards, but that doesn’t work. You can’t just put a cardboard cutout of a military man in a movie and expect the audience to be emotionally invested in the guy — unless the actors are real Navy SEALs, as was the case with ‘Act of Valor.’

Aaron Taylor-Johnson Ford Brody Godzilla
“Hey there. I’m in the Navy. I look like a good guy. You know absolutely nothing about me, but I’m supposed to carry this thing for 90 minutes until Godzilla shows up. You with me?”

To make matters worse for ‘Godzilla,’ it then seems to take a page out of the playbook of ‘Jaws 4: The Revenge.’ The monsters in the film follow Ford Brody from Japan to Hawaii, and then just-so-happen to head for San Fransisco — where his wife and child reside. Mrs. Brody is so concerned about her missing husband that she … leaves her phone in another room on vibrate and misses his call. Smart lady.

Remember when Ellen Brody went from Amity Island to the Bahamas and a giant great white shark followed her in 1987s ‘Jaws: The Revenge’? If not, you’re lucky. Regardless, it boggles the mind why screenwriter Dave Callaham would seemingly draw inspiration from such a disaster.

If you want to see Godzilla do some really cool stuff, I suggest waiting a few months until the best parts make it into a 10 minute YouTube compilation. There are about three shots in ‘Godzilla’ that are downright awesome, but the rest of the movie is dull and boring.The scientists are idiots, the military is filled with idiots and the civilians are all pretty much useless. Godzilla saves the day, the city claps as he walks back into the ocean, and the movie ends. Done. It was 123 minutes that could have been boiled down to 20 because the fight scenes between the monsters were all that mattered.

If you have a choice between seeing ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ and ‘Godzilla,’ for the love of God do yourself a favor and see ‘X-Men.’ You’ll be glad you did.

 

‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ may be the most important superhero movie ever

‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ may be the most important superhero movie of all time. I don’t say that lightly. Those whose blood pressure is starting to rise should take note: I didn’t say it was the “most fun” or “action packed” movie of all time — I said it may be the most important film ever.

Right out of the gates director Bryan Singer lets the audience know he’s created a movie about big ideas. When the first thing a director asks is “Does free will exist?” he’s given himself a tall order to fulfill:

Charles Xavier: The future…a dark desolate world. A world at war. Suffering and loss on both sides. Mutants and the humans who dared to help them fighting an enemy we can not defeat. Are we destined down this path, destined to destroy ourselves like so many species before us? Or can we evolve fast enough to change ourselves, change our fate? Is the future truly set?

Everything from the visuals and the narration to the music by John Ottman says: “This movie has gravity. Leave now if you just want a mindless popcorn flick.”

Charles Xavier

How many of us yearn to be able to go back in time and visit our younger selves — to talk some sense into them? What price would you pay for a single attempt to impart wisdom and knowledge on your reckless youthful counterpart — who wouldn’t listen to anyone — because maybe, just maybe, he’d listen to you? What if you could go back in time and convey something to your younger consciousness that would save all sorts of pain and suffering that you — although you wouldn’t ever admit it publicly — caused friends and loved ones? What if you’ve created a “dark desolate world” for yourself, but you knew there was a moment in time that could set things on a very different path? Would you risk ripping your consciousness into a million pieces for a chance to travel through space and time to set things right?

These are all very deep questions, and the actors tasked with making it all real to the audience do a magnificent job. James McAvoy, Hugh Jackman, Peter Dinklage, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Evan Peters and basically the entire cast all do a commendable job. Everyone who was required to provide emotional weight to movie comes through in the clutch, and the end result is a movie worth watching many times.

Charles Xavier Young Old XMen

In addition to the covering free will, ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ covers redemption. The turning point in the film (major spoilers ahead — you have been warned) comes when young Charles finally comes face-to-face with his older self.

Young Charles: So this what becomes of us. Eric was right. Humanity does this to us.

Old Charles: Not if we show them a better past.

Young Charles: You still believe?

Old Charles: Just because someone stumbles and loses their way, it doesn’t mean they’re lost forever. Sometimes we need a little help.

Young Charles: I’m not the man I was. I open my mind and it almost overwhelms me.

Old Charles: You’re afraid, and Cerebro knows it.

Young Charles: In all those voices…so much pain.

Old Charles: It’s not their pain you’re afraid of — it’s yours. And frightening as it can be their pain will make you stronger if you allow yourself to feel it. Embrace it. It will make you more powerful than you ever imagined. It’s the greatest gift we have that can bear pain without breaking, and it’s born from the most human power: Hope. Please Charles, we need you to hope again.

Can you forgive yourself for all the mistakes you’ve made? Can you forgive your friends and loved ones for the pain they’ve inflicted upon you? Can you forgive humanity for all the injustices it’s inflicted upon itself? Can you find strength in pain and then use that strength to make the world a better place? These are all questions asked by Singer, and the end result is a movie that aims — and largely succeeds — at affecting those who are willing to let it do so on the deepest of philosophical levels.

Charles Xavier Days of Future Past

In short, the evolution of Charles Xavier over the course of the film from a broken man and into the hero who would lead the X-Men to a better tomorrow is nearly flawless. Along the way you might even forget that you’re watching “just” a superhero movie and find yourself welling up inside. For much of the movie you don’t know how it’s going to turn out. Yes, fans “know” how it’s going to end (another movie is on the way, of course) but the writing, acting and directing are so good that it’s easy to get lost in it all and say, “Wow, they might not pull this out.”

Luckily, Professor Xavier regains his hope at a pivotal point in the film.

Hank McCoy: There’s a theory in quantum physics that time is immutable. It’s like a river — you can throw a pebble in and create a ripple, but the current always corrects itself. No matter what you do the river just keeps flowing in the same direction.

Wolverine: What are you trying to say?

Beast: What I’m saying is, what if the war is inevitable? What if she’s meant to kill Trask? What if this is simply who she is?

Charles Xavier: Just because someone stumbles and loses their way it doesn’t mean they’re lost forever. No, I don’t believe that theory Hank, and I can not believe that is who she is. Ready the plane. We’re going to Washington.

If you get a chance to see ‘X-Men: Days of Future Past’ in theaters, I would highly suggest making the trip. It’s rare for a movie to work on so many levels, and the fact that it’s an X-Men film makes this longtime Marvel fan very happy.

Editor’s Note for regular readers: I know I mentioned not being able to pay to see this movie, given the storm clouds hanging over the director’s head. I went to the movie theater with every intention of paying for Godzilla and then walking into X-Men: Days of Future Past, but the theater turned out to be about the size of my bedroom. There was no way I could pull it off without creating an awkward scene, so I allowed a friend to pay for me. I still don’t feel right about it, so if Mr. Singer’s legal issues do not turn out in his favor I will make a donation that would in all likelihood meet his accuser’s approval.

‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’: Ben Stiller makes a film that matters

Ben Stiller Walter Mitty skate

I love Ben Stiller as a writer-director-actor, but I have a rule about seeing movies with Sean Penn, given his history of wishing critics rectal cancer. When a friend of mine asked me to see ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ I decided to break my own rule, and I’m glad I did. With Mitty, Mr. Stiller has made a film that matters.

“To see the world, things dangerous to come to, to see behind walls, draw closer, to find each other, and to feel. That is the purpose of life.” — LIFE magazine

Ben Stiller’s Walter Mitty has worked at LIFE magazine for 16 years in its negative assets department. As the publication prepares to shut down he somehow manages to lose the negative to its final cover, a special image sent in by world-renowned photographer Sean O’Connell (Sean Penn). The photo, said to represent the “quintessence of life,” (or was that quintessence of LIFE?) sends perpetual daydreamer Mitty on a journey of self-discovery that will forever end his ability to settle for less.

Ben Stiller Walter Mitty

The trailers for ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ played up his daydreams, but in truth the movie doesn’t really get going until the character decides to take a leap of faith into the unknown in search of “negative 25.” It is at that point his budding relationship with coworker Cheryl (Kristen Wiig) begins to grow and unfold, and the courage and confidence within him finally breaks through to the outside world — particularly in the presence of the suits in charge of reorganizing (i.e., downsizing) LIFE for the digital marketplace.

Walter Mitty Ben Stiller

Anyone who has followed this blog knows that I’m a big advocate of following your heart. For Walter Mitty, his early sadness stemmed from not chasing down his dreams and aspirations. His regret manifested itself in elaborate daydreams. In real life, the “Walter” in all of us makes himself known with bouts of anger, sadness, and depression. Symptoms of “Walter” may include insomnia, irritability, or a short fuse with friends and loved ones. We try to cope with “Walter” with an endless string of vices.

It takes courage to really life life, and it’s harder if an individual didn’t have a support network to help cultivate it growing up. Living life to its fullest requires a willingness to confront all that it has to offer — including failure. Ben Stiller’s direction of ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ isn’t perfect, but the care with which he approached the subject matter more than makes up for a few slightly awkward dream sequences early on in the film.

If you want to see a movie that encourages viewers to ditch the mundane while motivating their inner adventurer to step forward, make some time to watch ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.’

Ben Affleck to Republican Batman fans: I ‘probably’ don’t like you — but I want your money

Ben Affleck fans

In August I said that the thing that would hurt Ben Affleck the most as he attempted to become Batman was his outspoken politics: “If I were a betting man, I’d say that Mr. Affleck will continue saying and doing things in public that will make it harder for roughly half the nation to lose themselves in his version of “Batman” on opening night.”

Now, in an interview with Playboy, he proves me right.

Affleck: People now know me as a Democrat, and that will always be the case to some extent.

Playboy: Does that polarize viewers?

Affleck: It does, and you can bifurcate your audience. When I watch a guy I know is a big Republican, part of me thinks, I probably wouldn’t like this person if I met him, or we would have different opinions. That shit fogs the mind when you should be paying attention and be swept into the illusion.

Playboy: Still, won’t that happen whether you take positions on candidates or causes?

Affleck: I have misgivings about it, counterbalanced with the larger things I care about. I don’t blindly do this stuff when it makes it harder to do my own job. And there’s an awful lot of gross money-raising going on that has made me want to pull back a bit from pure electoral politics. […]

Yes Ben, if the guy you’re watching on screen is a Republican and you’re a Democrat, it’s safe to say that you’ll have “different opinions.” Your powers of deduction are not quite at Bruce Wayne’s level at the moment, but you are correct.

Here’s the part that is somewhat bizarre for the future Batman to disclose: “I probably wouldn’t like this person…”

There are a lot of things I think about Matt Damon and Ben Affleck and most of Hollywood’s liberal activists, but I only tend to think “I wouldn’t like them” when they come across as elitist jerks. How someone comports themselves dictates how I feel about them as a person — a political party affiliation alone does not. Does Ben Affleck have zero Republican relatives? He must not, or he wouldn’t say such ridiculous things.

I love my fellow Americans. I want to like all of them and I want to give them the benefit of the doubt, but it’s hard when guys like Ben Affleck and President Obama keep dividing people.

He’s what President Obama said to Univision in 2010:

“We’re gonna punish our enemies and we’re gonna reward our friends who stand with us on issues that are important to us.”

Here’s what Slate’s John Cook said in his maybe-sorta-kinda piece of satire (but not) titled ‘Thanksgiving Tips: How to pick a fight with your relatives this Thanksgiving.’ It was written just in time to coincide with the White House’s push to get family members to discuss Obamacare over the holidays:

First off, you should wait until everyone’s seated at the table before you try to get things started. That way you have a captive audience that has to watch the fireworks, and everyone is settled in for a nice long time. Getting the topic of conversation to politics shouldn’t be too hard. Stick to short, sarcastic, tendentious remarks to get things going. “I’m thankful for all that free stuff Obama gave me.” Once you’ve engaged the enemy, it won’t take much effort to pivot to whatever particular subject you feel most comfortable with.

Yes, according to the president and his most ardent disciples, your fellow Americans are “enemies.” Does anyone else find it weird that the president won’t call any number of thug-nations around the globe an enemy of America, but he will refer to his political opponents as such? But I digress…

Instead of just admitting that activist actors “fog the mind” of the audience with all sorts of extraneous junk, Ben Affleck lets us all know that an ‘R’ next to your name makes him immediately think that he “probably” doesn’t like you — even though he wants your money.

Why should I cough up my money for ‘Superman vs. Batman (vs. Wonder Woman?)’ when one of the lead actors openly conveys his disgust for me as a person? Because of my love of free markets, limited government, traditional American values and a strong national defense, Ben Affleck “probably” wouldn’t like me? It’s weird.

Yes Ben, it is possible to disagree with someone without being disagreeable. I know it’s hard for someone who lives in a Hollywood bubble, where everyone thinks along the same lines and tells each other how smart they are at cocktail parties (“Pass me the gruyère, will you?”) — but in the real world some of us get along with our politically-diverse family and friends just fine.

If Zack Snyder is smart, he’ll sit down privately with Ben and tell him to shut up with the political commentary until ‘Superman vs. Batman’ comes out. There are a lot of people who aren’t thrilled with the idea of Ben Affleck as the Dark Knight, and alienating roughly half the viewing audience out the gate is probably not a good PR move.

Hat tip to douglasernstblog.com reader PersonIsPerson for the story.

Related: Ben Affleck’s outspoken politics hurt his Batman more than his box office bombs

Related: Snyder’s ‘Man of Steel’ hits audiences with big ideas, soars over small-minded critics

Related: Man of Steel Trailer: Harbinger of an epic film

Related: David Goyer is right: The ‘Superman doesn’t kill’ rule hurts the character

Related: ‘Soldier of Steel’ campaign: Gym Jones shows what real men are made of

‘Thor: The Dark World’: Tom Hiddleston makes Marvel’s job easy

Tom HIddleson LokiDark Elves, monsters and Tom Hiddleston as Loki in ‘Thor: The Dark World’ — what can go wrong? Not much, really. Audiences seem to agree:

Marvel Studios and Disney’s Thor: The Dark World thundered its way to a $86.1 million domestic launch as it continued its global assault, finishing the weekend with a sizeable $327 million in worldwide ticket sales.

That’s an impressive start considering the first Thor, which debuted to $65.7 million domestically in May 2011, grossed $449.3 million globally in all. The sequel nabbed one of the top November openings of all time in North America, although it couldn’t quite match the $88.4 million earned by Skyfall on the same weekend a year ago.

Marvel Studios is making it look easy at this point, which is rather impressive given the number of moving parts each of these films have. Kevin Feige, President of Production at Marvel Studios, must be eating his Cheerios or Wheaties over the last couple of years, because his job performance has been strong.

Anyone who goes to ‘Thor: The Dark World’ looking for a complex plot will be disappointed: Creatures of darkness want to fill all of existence filled with darkness. Thor must stop them. He does. The end.

Those who are looking for a little action, a little adventure, a helping of humor and a good dose of Tom Hiddleston’s Loki making everything he touches awesome will be pleased. Adopted kid who has all sorts of issues with mother, father and brother constantly plots and plans ways to show that he loves them  — and hates them — to death. The end.

Chris Hemsworth does a fine job as Thor — he looks the part, is believably noble and worthy of Mjolnir — but it’s the nature of his relationship with his adopted brother Loki that makes the trek to the movie theater worth it. Hiddleston, in many ways, is the glue that holds the whole thing together. Without him, ‘The Dark World’ becomes an exponentially duller film. It may seem sad that, in his own movie, Thor needs Loki in order to achieve his full box-office potential, but is it really? You can’t have Yin without Yang, and you can’t fully appreciate Thor’s honor without holding him up to the actions of his mischievous brother.

At one point in ‘The Dark World’ Thor says, “Mother wouldn’t want us to fight.” Loki’s response: ” But she wouldn’t be that surprised.” Note to Thor: moviegoers want you to fight. We like when the anger and the jealously and the sibling rivalry plays out on screen because in our own mini-Asgards we deal with it every day. Do we overcome the pettiness and achieve great things, or do we give into our darker half and do as Loki would? If we see ourselves as manipulators, do we manipulate to serve our own selfish ends, or do we manipulate others so that they might soar? Seeing that struggle as depicted by Hiddleston is what elevates Marvel’s second Thor movie from “I’ll wait until it’s on Netflix” to “I’ll be there opening weekend sitting one row behind the girl with the Thor outfit on.”

If you’re looking for a fun “popcorn” movie to see this November, make a trip to see Thor’s second solo movie. If you want to see something that is critically acclaimed that doesn’t lend itself to carelessly flicking popcorn into your mouth, see “12 years a slave.”

Note: To the person who sees Marvel movies and then continues to leave as soon as the end credits begin to roll, I have a question for you: Why? You know you’re not supposed to, but you do it anyway. I say this out of love: Get with the program, already.

At long last, Michael Moore openly admits he hates the troops

Michael Moore wants you to know he's going to stop saying he "supports the troops" — because he doesn't. It's not really news; most of us knew he never did. (Image: AP)
Michael Moore wants you to know he’s going to stop saying he “supports the troops” — because he doesn’t. It’s not really news; most of us knew he never did. (Image: AP)

In the last remaining hours of 2012, the New York Times enlisted a liberal scholar to finally admit the truth — guys like him want to do away with the Constitution. In the past I’ve tried to say that liberal activists loath the constraints the Constitution places upon their utopian goals, and their defenders have insisted that no, that isn’t the case, and that it’s all just a figment of my radical conservative imagination. Louis Seidman’s willingness to publicly admit his disdain for the document makes my job much easier. I can’t thank him enough.

Likewise, for years I’ve talked about liberal activists who hate our military. Regular readers know that my own conversion to the conservative side of the fence started with leftist professors who said: “Only redneck Republican hicks who are happy to get a free pair of boots join the military.” These likely-tenured academics also gave extra credit to go see Michael Moore’s “Bowling for Columbine,” which dovetails nicely into the filmmaker’s New Year’s confession: He doesn’t support the troops.

Numbers four and five on his “to do” list for 2013 are as follows:

4. Stop saying, “I support the troops.” I don’t. I used to. I understand why so many enlisted after 9/11. Sadly, many of them were then trapped and sent off to invade Iraq. I felt for all of them. I understood those who joined because of a lousy economy. But at some point all individuals must answer for their actions, and now that we know our military leaders do things that have nothing to do with defending our lives, why would anyone sign up for this rogue organization?

5. Apologize for No. 4. I have enormous respect for anyone who would offer to sacrifice their life to defend my right to live. Is there any greater gift one can give another? It’s not the troops’ fault they’re sent to invade other countries for dubious reasons and outright lies. It’s OUR responsibility to prevent this, to elect representatives who believe in peace, and to only put our troops in harm’s way when it’s absolutely necessary. My uncle was killed in World War II. Today would have been his 90th birthday. My dad still misses him. Our family has served this country in the military since the Revolutionary War. None of them watch Fox News.

See what Moore does there? He realizes that he can’t directly come out and say that he hates the troops, so he has to add some mealy-mouthed addendum about his uncle’s military service during World War II.

What Michael Moore says at first is that the servicemen who enlisted well into the Iraq War and up to today knew what the mission was and enlisted anyway because on many levels they believed in the mission. But Michael Moore doesn’t believe in the mission. This puts Moore in the position where he desperately wants to make such soldiers “answer for their actions,” (i.e., invading countries “for dubious reasons” or supporting “outright lies”), but he can’t because he doesn’t want to be known as the guy who would have spit all over returning Vietnam Vets decades ago while screaming “baby killer!” So what does he do? He surreptitiously telegraphs that he absolutely despises guys like Marcus Luttrell and Chris Kyle and Mark Owen (I won’t use Owen’s real name here), before redirecting attention to a safe target — the civilian leaders who ultimately determine where the U.S. military’s might will be used around the globe.

Michael Moore infamously called al Qaeda in Iraq and former Baathist regime thugs “freedom fighters.” Since many of his supporters adhere to the “one man’s freedom fighter is another man’s terrorist” mentality, it was hard to nail them down and get them to admit that their idol was rooting for dead American soldiers. But with Moore’s 2013 resolution, the wiggle room for sane adults nears zero.

Thank you for finally admitting to the world in 2013 what some of us veterans always knew, Mr. Moore. It’s refreshing to run across a little honesty from you for a change.

Related: Michael Moore: Let’s stand in front of the Obamacare ‘locomotive’ and see what happens