Your friendly neighborhood blogger wrote on Oct. 12, 2016, that one problem with writing stories about conspiracies is that they sometimes get so big and convoluted that they collapse under their own weight. Dan Slott’s fourth installment of The Clone Conspiracy (along with The Amazing Spider-Man #23), are clear-cut examples to study for any aspiring writing to study.

The problem with The Clone Conspiracy, as is often the case with Mr. Slott’s work, is that he creatively bites off more than he can chew before realizing that he must somehow finish the whole meal on a tight timeline.

Check out my latest YouTube video for the more detailed explanation of why the Marvel event is imploding, and then let me know what you think in the comments below. As always, if you like what you see in the video format, then make sure to subscribe for regular updates.

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

2 comments

  1. Ben’s villain-turn sounds like the dramatic rule of Chekov’s Gun backward. Checkov said if you introduce a gun in act 1, it needs to go off in act 3.

    In the story summary I’ve read, instead of a gun suspensefully introduced in act 1 and then going off in act 3, we have this gun (Ben becoming evil) going off in act 3 but the “gun” hadn’t been introduced. Suddenly, there’s a gun. I gather there hasn’t been any foreshadowing of Ben/Jackal abruptly breaking very-bad when he’s under pressure or extreme disappointment. So Ben is suddenly “VILLAINY!”

    You attribute this to Slott needing to wrap up the story (need to a big fight scene to end the adventure). I wonder if he’s also intending to depict Ben27’s instability. But I gather Ben27 through this story hasn’t seemed particularly unstable. From what I’ve seen, Ben/Jackal has acted in a pretty sane way, and even chastised his minions for injuring people (like She-lectro charbroiling Hobie). There doesn’t seem to be any lead-up to Ben’s turn.

    1. “I gather there hasn’t been any foreshadowing of Ben/Jackal abruptly breaking very-bad when he’s under pressure or extreme disappointment. So Ben is suddenly ‘VILLAINY!'”

      I don’t think so, and apparently Mike McNulty (Stillanerd) feels the same way. Check out his latest review.

      “There doesn’t seem to be any lead-up to Ben’s turn.”

      Not really. I feel as though Dan originally had the idea of this story concluding with Peter saying, “You have the means and the power — but no responsibility,” but for whatever reason it wasn’t all scripted out. He knew where he wanted to end up, but all the details weren’t there when he needed them. Perhaps a deadline came up and he was like, “Ummmm, nuts.” Ben’s turn literally happens with the snap of the fingers and as a reader you’re like, “Really? This is happening like this? We’re really doing it this way, Dan? Okay.”

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