It’s here — The Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows. There is much to say on this issue (and I may do up a full re-write in the near future), but my latest YouTube review should suffice for now. Check it out and let me know what you think of Gerry Conway’s and Ryan Stegman’s work in the comments section below.

Finally — finally — the throngs of fans who hated One More Day get the Peter Parker they deserve. Huzzah!

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

17 comments

  1. Good review Doug. This is indeed Spider-MAN, not Man-Boy Stark Jr, nor is it thankfully, and crucially, cowardly non-committal Mary Jane either. These are the characters as they were before we were so rudely interrupted. I’m interested in the angle being played with regarding Normie, he appears to have inherited Oscorp early, indicating something has happened to his mother (a routine occurence in alternate realitys, Liz dies, Normie goes off the rails), perhaps Harry’s ressurection did not occur in this universe? I’ve always suspected the deal in OMD was what really brought Harry back anyway.

    Annie comes across as adorable and annoying, but in a way that makes you go “well, my kid’s annoying”, the back-up strips where a much younger Annie is looked after by Sandman was sound too and reminded me of those cherished 90s days where Sandman wasn’t altogether a bad egg at all (something Slott touched on in his own RYV series when he depicted Sandman as a resistance fighter)

    Overall, a fun breezy easy-to-follow restoration of the Spider-Man elements we both want and what the characters so desperately need as much as us.

    1. “Overall, a fun breezy easy-to-follow restoration of the Spider-Man elements we both want and what the characters so desperately need as much as us.”

      It’s been a long, long time since there has been a Spider-Man book that I was legitimately excited to pick up. I wish these guys the best and hope they continue to knock it out of the park.

  2. Great video! I’ve already bought 3 physical copies and bought it on comixology as well. My comic shop guy is going to try to get me all of the variant covers too, so hopefully I’ll be buying those soon.

    As soon as I finished the issue I had a huge smile on my face. THIS is how you do a Spider-Man comic. This is how you do a comic book in general, respectful of the character and fun to read. It feels natural, and seeing the family relationship dynamics between Peter, Mary Jane and Annie is an absolute joy to read, I am so happy to have a comic with MJ and Peter back together, and Annie as written here is my new favorite character that Marvel has introduced in YEARS. I want to see Annie meet her alternate-universe big sister, May, someday. The addition of the camera drone is great too.

    Seeing Peter as a father and his role in raising his daughter is so fun. The backup Sandman story has more heart, feeling and the actual Peter Parker than any issue of ASM Slott has put out for the last almost 10 years. The only time he came close was in the RYV mini-series. It’s almost like this story works better for Peter than anything else they try,.. a curious thing, that! Who would have thought that Peter being married to MJ and dealing with the struggles in daily life as a husband and father bring out the real character more than making him a global business owner, and increasingly overshadowed Spider-Man in a world of multiple other Spider-heroes.

    Like you said, the issue isn’t without it’s flaws, but the positives outshine them so much I don’t care. It may be an alternate universe, but I feel like I finally have Peter Parker back. I have the relationship between Peter and MJ back, and I’ve gained a story and character in Annie that I’ve always wanted.

    THIS is how you get me to say, “Make mine Marvel.”

    1. “As soon as I finished the issue I had a huge smile on my face. THIS is how you do a Spider-Man comic. This is how you do a comic book in general, respectful of the character and fun to read. It feels natural, and seeing the family relationship dynamics between Peter, Mary Jane and Annie is an absolute joy to read, I am so happy to have a comic with MJ and Peter back together, and Annie as written here is my new favorite character that Marvel has introduced in YEARS.”

      Agreed. It makes you wonder how on earth it took this long for the editors at Marvel to just swallow their pride on the marriage thing and do the right thing. Fans wanted this. Why is it so hard to actually give fans what they want?

      “THIS is how you get me to say, ‘Make mine Marvel.'”

      Exactly.

    1. “Going to my LCS tomorrow. I’ve ordered 3 physical copies too. Can’t wait.”

      It was such a strange feeling to read a Spider-Man book from start to finish and think, “It could always be this good if Marvel wanted! What the heck?!”

  3. The sad thing is that spin-off titles tend to get lower sales than the main book, I hope this is an exception and people tell with their hard earned cash which Spider-Man they want to read. A good story with the proper characterization or a plot heavy story that gives no care to the characterization.

  4. Got a copy, really liked it. Good illustrations and writing. I actually think that Conway handles dialogue and humor better than Slott did in the original RYV miniseries, although I slightly prefer Adam Kubert’s artwork to Stegman’s.

    Kind of interesting that Marvel is giving the pre-OMD Spider-Man a classy revival (albeit in its own little world) after years of ostensibly trying to do everything to get rid of it and keep it out.

    According to a poster on a forum I hang out on, RYV didn’t topple Slott’s last “Clone” issue (at number 10 on top sellers), but it did open at number 16. If that’s accurate, it sounds like RYV had a strong opening (esp. considering how long since the original came out), so hopefully it’ll get enough of an audience to stay afloat for a good while.

    1. “According to a poster on a forum I hang out on, RYV didn’t topple Slott’s last “Clone” issue (at number 10 on top sellers), but it did open at number 16. If that’s accurate, it sounds like RYV had a strong opening (esp. considering how long since the original came out), so hopefully it’ll get enough of an audience to stay afloat for a good while.”

      It kind of annoys me that RYVs is coming out while Marvel already has a Spider-Man event outside “ASM proper” going on. If you enjoy Spider-Man, you’re already being asked over the next few months to get Clone Conspiracy, the tie-ins, ASM … and now RYVs. On top of that, Civil War II is STILL weirdly going on. So Marvel has released this wonderful book, but it’s just thrown it into the mix after already asking a lot of its core readers.

      One could make the case that on many levels Marvel is knee-capping RYVs right from the beginning. Their marketing efforts these days are simply atrocious.

  5. “One could make the case that on many levels Marvel is knee-capping RYVs right from the beginning. Their marketing efforts these days are simply atrocious.”

    Since Marvel went to the trouble and expense of producing it in the first place, I think they want it sell (it doesn’t make much sense for them to go to the trouble to make something they want to fail just to make a point or something). For what it’s worth, it was supposed to be part of the fall’s “Marvel Now” program, so releasing it at a time when they’re creating a lot of new series or changing directions with older ones makes some sense, although I do agree that having it come when there are two big events going on (including a Spider-Man-centric one) was not the best break for RYV. (But then, from what little l’ve seen of reviews and reader’s opinions, it seems like RYV was really well-liked, while the “Clone” event seems to be given more shrugs and less enthusiasm. At least whenever I’ve heard someone cite a comic shop owner’s opinion, they seem more baffled by the existence of the “Clone” event than anything else.)

    However, number 16 for the first issue (and still for sale) is a petty good start. While it would’ve been nice to see it outdo the “Clone” stuff, I’m more worried about the series staying in print period than it “proving” that it’s better than Slott’s version. Since I’ve heard that events tend to sell more than regular comics, would it be more equitable to compare RYV’s sale to the normal ASM comic issue’s sales?

    1. “Since Marvel went to the trouble and expense of producing it in the first place, I think they want it sell (it doesn’t make much sense for them to go to the trouble to make something they want to fail just to make a point or something).”

      Correct. That’s why I stressed that Marvel’s marketing efforts have been “atrocious.”

      Although, if Marvel wanted to validate its current preference for PC pap that dumps on the classic characters, then one way to do that would be to release RYV at a bad time, give it junk marketing, and then when it underperformed say, “See! See! We need more PC. We need less classic Marvel. We need gay Iceman and RirRi Williams instead of classic Iceman and Tony Stark!”

      I’m not saying Marvel consciously made that that decision, but if someone did make that case I would not outright dismiss them.

  6. “Correct. That’s why I stressed that Marvel’s marketing efforts have been “atrocious.””

    Okay, makes sense.

    “Although, if Marvel wanted to validate its current preference for PC pap that dumps on the classic characters, then one way to do that would be to release RYV at a bad time, give it junk marketing, and then when it underperformed say, “See! See! We need more PC. We need less classic Marvel. We need gay Iceman and RirRi Williams instead of classic Iceman and Tony Stark!”

    I’m not saying Marvel consciously made that that decision, but if someone did make that case I would not outright dismiss them.”

    Maybe? Disney’s approach to the “Star Wars” reboot seems more practical; just come up with the new and replacement material, stick with that program, and let those who like or hate it like or hate it.

    1. “Great video Doug.”

      Thanks, man! Likewise on your review. 🙂

      “Like you it’s been a loooong since I’ve been this excited for Spider-Man, so much so that I purchased a few copies and variants, which I’ll show you once I received them and one particularly special one.”

      Yes, this finally felt like an authentic version of Peter Parker. When one compares this Peter to Dan Slott’s, there really is no contest. It’s almost like Dan Slott’s a Skrull…

  7. “Yes, this finally felt like an authentic version of Peter Parker. When one compares this Peter to Dan Slott’s, there really is no contest. It’s almost like Dan Slott’s a Skrull…”

    Out of curiosity, how do you think Slott’s RYV characterizations compare to Conway’s here?

    1. “Out of curiosity, how do you think Slott’s RYV characterizations compare to Conway’s here?”

      If you look at Slott’s RYVs, you’ll see that he hit all the basic notes for a family of Parkers — and didn’t screw anything up — but the family dynamics were dealt with at a superficial level. There was some cutesy banter back and forth, but you can tell that this isn’t a guy who has experience raising children.

      With Conway’s RYVs, everything felt like this was a guy who drawing from real-life experiences and was appropriately applying them to Peter’s life. (I’m assuming there was collaboration with Stegman, too.) Conway’s dialogue just seems more natural than Slott’s, in general and especially with Annie.

      The best way to say it is that Dan seems to be inspired by television shows, whereas Conway seems inspired by real people he interacts with on a daily basis. Slott writes like a man who watches way too much television inside his New York City apartment; Conway writes like a man who better taps into universal experiences or feelings, which make his characters more relatable.

      The one thing that did strike me about Conway’s RYV was that it did not feel like it was written by a guy who is 64 years old. It felt “fresh,” and I simply was not expecting that. I’m not sure if you ever read Howard Mackie’s relaunch 1999, but that was absolutely atrocious. That was an instance where it was supposed to feel free and everything about it just felt off and out of touch.

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