Deadpool: Reynolds scores big, ‘Zamboni’ death scene a classic

Deadpool

It took roughly a decade for pinheads at Fox to give Deadpool the green light, and now Ryan Reynolds and Co. can officially have the last laugh. The “Merc with the mouth” crushed records over Valentine’s Day weekend for an R-rated movie: $135 million in North America and $125 million overseas.

The plot of Deadpool is fairly straightforward:  Wade Wilson loves a girl. Wade Wilson gets terminal cancer. Wade Wilson opts into an experiment he thinks will save his life and inadvertently gets duped by some nasty characters. Then, it’s time for revenge. Along the way he is aided by Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand) and Colossus (Stefan Kapicic).

In short, director Tim Miller makes sure that fans of Wade Wilson get everything they wanted from such a movie and more for 108 minutes. It’s witty, it’s raunchy, and it’s got plenty of action and even heart. There is also a death-by-Zamboni scene that is an instant classic.

Perhaps most surprisingly was the extended screen time for Colossus. I feared he would be in the movie for about one minute due to budget constraints, but that was not the case. He even was crowned the film’s moral compass.

At one point in the film he says to Deadpool:

“Four or five moments. Four or five moments — that’s all it takes to be a hero. Everyone thinks it’s a full-time job. Wake up a hero. Brush your teeth a hero. Go to work a hero. Not true. Over a lifetime there are only four or five moments that really matter. Moments when you’re offered a choice to make a sacrifice, conquer a flaw, save a friend — spare an enemy. In these moments everything else falls away.

What happens after this speech completely sums up who Wade Wilson is and why it would be best if he never joined the X-Men.

With that said, it must be stated that Deadpool is not for everyone and it is certainly not a movie for kids. More socially conservative viewers will certainly be disappointed with Stan Lee’s cameo (I laughed, but thought he probably should have passed on the offer for that specific scene), and anyone who is offended by sexual jokes or nudity should save their money.

There is no doubt that a sequel for Deadpool is already in the works — and this time Fox will put it on the fast track. The creative team that takes on the project would do themselves many favors by keeping a character like Colossus, an angel over Wilson’s shoulder, nearby. If they put the same amount of love and effort into the follow-up, then the sky is the limit for the Deadpool franchise.

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‘Deadpool’ trailer released — but will fans get the cinematic equivalent of ‘Chinese Democracy’?

Deadpool Ryan ReynoldsFor those who have been waiting for Ryan Reynolds to play Deadpool on the big screen since 2004’s Blade: Trinity — or perhaps even as far back as the late-90s sitcom Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place — the good news is that the first trailer is finally here. A red band trailer has been released as well. The bad news is a.) some of the jokes may have been sitting on the shelf since the late 90s, and b.) Fox may have set Deadpool up for failure with an extremely low budget. Right now it’s time to strip out the raw emotion of seeing the “Merc with a Mouth” in his own trailer and determine what looks promising and what does not.

Colossus DeadpoolIt seems undeniable that Ryan Reynolds has put in 100 percent effort into the role. The guy was basically born to play Deadpool, and since he’s in shape — and finally has a worthy costume — it’s hard not to smile whenever he is on screen. (I would still love to know the name of the Fox producer who gave Deadpool a generic costume and sewed his mouth shut for 2009’s X-Men Origins: Wolverine.)

With that said, there are some question marks raised by the trailer. Does it take place in the late 90s or early 2000s? What was the production budget? Can Deadpool succeed if Fox technically green-lighted the movie while simultaneously setting it up for failure?

Consider this: Why are there “Posh Spice” and “Rosie O’Donnell” references? Unless part of the movie takes place well over a decade ago, those jokes seem incredibly dated. Is the DMX music and the Salt-N-Pepa reference another movie flashback, or are the writers just letting Generation X Deadpool fans know that this movie is primarily for them?

Part of the problem with finally seeing Ryan Reynolds in the merc’s costume is that he’s been playing watered down versions of Wade Wilson on television and film for almost 20 years. On some level the new Deadpool movie has the same vibe as Axl Rose’s 2008 album “Chinese Democracy.” The album was actually pretty good — but it still felt like a product that was released too little, too late.

The other potential problem with Deadpool is its budget. Mr. Reynolds told MTV in January:

“We don’t have the kind of money that most superhero movies do, but that’s great, actually. Necessity is the mother of invention, and that’s why we get to make the movie we want to make.”

Ryan Reynolds gets an ‘A’ in Diplomacy 101, but at the end of the day one can’t help but wonder if Fox kneecapped Deadpool’s creative team and then said, “Okay, now go make a hit movie!”

Whether Deadpool is good or bad when it comes out in 2016, Ryan Reynolds and everyone who believed in this film should be given credit for essentially willing it into existence. They moved a creative mountain (or two) just to get the fools at Fox to allow the movie to be made. For that the writers, director, actors, and crew deserve a round of applause.

Green Lantern Ryan Reynolds Swipe a Declaration of War by Allahpundit; Conservative Comic Nerd Returns Fire.

Hmmm. Ryan Reynolds looks eerily familiar to Tony Stark here. Does Allahpundit have a point? It doesn't matter. He should hold his fire because comics generally have conservative themes (particularly a character like Hal Jordan) and they resonate with youth. Unlike Meghan McCain.

Allahpundit has thrown down the gauntlet. I’ve been a long time fan of his work, but we all know that from time time to he finds ways to test even his hard core fans’ patience (think Meghan McCain ).  This time, war has been declared on Conservative Comic Nerds everywhere!

Needless to say, if they’re now this far down into the bottom of the comics barrel for superhero movie ideas [i.e., a Green Lantern movie], it won’t be long before pre-production on an Aquaman flick is announced. We all know it’s coming, so let’s start preparing mentally.

You called down the thunder, Allah, well now you got it!

The comic book movie that started an amazing run that hasn’t stopped since 1998 was Blade. It showed the industry of the marketing potential that existed, even in lesser known comic superheroes (interestingly enough, it was Ryan Reynolds who stole the show from Wesley “I want to be Charlie Rangel and not pay my taxes” Snipes in Blade III, an underrated flick in my opinion). Green Lantern isn’t some two-bit superhero—he’s a classic.  And even though there are two or three Jonah Hexs for every Iron Man, overall comic book movies help instill the kinds of moral codes today’s liberalism habitually tears down.

Watchmen was loaded with conservative values (even though it was written by a left-wing moon bat). Kick Ass makes the case for American Exceptionalism better than 98% of all conservative commentators out there. The list goes on and on. I’d rather hold my fire on Ryan Reynolds when he’s portraying a superhero because it’s only a matter a time before he plays another US contractor buried in Iraq. Think of all the mouthpieces of the left, and then imagine them inadvertently planting the seeds of conservatism in a generation of young minds because they played Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, Captain America, or some obscure hero whose principles shackle liberal screenwriters into crafting characters Americans can be proud of.

I know that there are going to be embarrassingly bad comics movies made every year, but it’s the one area of popular culture where conservatives have the upper hand. Our ideas sell, and Hollywood can’t deny it.  Conservatism is articulated on screen every time a hero doesn’t hesitate to identify evil—and fights it. Liberal moral relativists will groan in pain if Captain America shines instead of becoming Saturday night entertainment for Euro-weenies and Jihadi Film Clubs. It makes no sense to make jokes at the expense of the one genre that imparts conservative values and resonates with young people.

I’m praying to God that they come out with The Umbrella Academy: Dallas. While Allah (and again, I love your work) might instinctually consider it the bottom of the barrel, I enthusiastically recommend it to anyone thinking about buying a graphic novel sometime soon. It’s written by Gerard Way of My Chemical Romance. Take a look at their latest video. Watch it and tell me there aren’t conservative motifs everywhere (e.g., evil centralized government, underground radio, American muscle cars, resistance movements). Do we have another closet conservative on our hands? Who knows, but I don’t want to disrupt whatever inspired it.

Likewise, I have my fingers crossed for the day when Zack Synder finally comes out of the conservative closet. I can’t wait to see what he does with Superman.

I’m going to chalk up Allah’s Green Lantern misstep to latent jealousy at Ryan Reynolds’ rock hard abs (I know I’m jealous). But if it happens again, all options are on the table; I’m going Nuclear Nerd on the pundit from hotair.

Go to Vegas and put money on The Umbrella Academy to be a hit movie. If you want you can thank me by sending a portion of your proceeds to my bank account. I have a lot of student loans to pay off, and I can't write as much as I want until they're gone.