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One of the most fascinating things about Marvel writer Dan Slott’s decision to turn his Twitter feed into a giant political soapbox is that readers get to see his never-ending stream of hypocrisy. When shootings or terror-related issues capture national headlines, he is always there to show fans of The Amazing Spider-Man that crafting strong stories comes secondary to political hackery.

An improvised explosive device — a pressure cooker bomb — went off Thursday night in New York City and injured 29 people. A secondary device that failed to detonate was found blocks away. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told an audience of the explosion as news broke, and for that Mr. Slott called it a “new low.”

Anyone who is familiar with Mr. Slott’s online behavior over the years knows that the two men have more in common than he would like to admit. What makes this moment even richer is that his “new low” remark came moments after retweeting the following by another user: “Reminder: Donald Trump is actively rooting for the explosion in NYC to turn out to be a terrorist attack. Let that sick reality sink in.”

Dan Slott’s self awareness knows no bounds. It is indeed a “new low” to accuse a New Yorker of “actively rooting” for terrorism in New York.

Here is a”reminder” for everyone: Dan Slott is the same person who once said he wanted people to “politicize the f**k” out of his death if he were ever shot…“the second after news hits.”

dan-slott-nyc-explosion-tweets

Here is what Mr. Trump said:

“Just before I got off the plane, a bomb went off in New York and nobody knows exactly what’s going on, but, boy we are really in a time. We better get very tough, folks. It’s a terrible thing that’s going on in our world and in our country and we are going to get tough and smart and vigilant. We’ll see what it is.”

Question: Is it more deplorable for a presidential candidate to factually state that a bomb has gone off and that an investigation is underway, or for a writer to say that political opponents “actively root” for terrorism in their home town?

The answer is self-evident.

dan-slott-politicize-the-f

Even if Mr. Slott were correct and Mr. Trump was politicizing the bombing, what would give the writer the moral authority to lecture anyone on such behavior?

When a man tells tens-of-thousands of supporters to “please politicize” his own murder “the second after news hits,” he cannot harangue others for picking up the partisan baton and running with it.

Dan Slott’s Twitter feed is a free resource for anyone who ever wanted to learn about projection. His habitual need to blast “new lows” comes from the knowledge deep within his soul that it is he who engages in loathsome behavior.

Some of Mr. Slott’s many “new lows” have been chronicled here, since mainstream comic book websites fail to demand a modicum of professional behavior from the industry’s artists and writers:

The next time Mr. Slott starts bashing Donald Trump, I suggest reminding him that his online antics have mirrored the New York billionaire for many years. My guess is that the writer with impulse-control problems will block you, but that is to be expected as long as he continues to live in denial.

Update: 

Dan Slott, who blocked me on Twitter, once again shows the world that he still can’t help but read this blog. As usual, his tweets are filled with red herrings and utter falsities, which is why he won’t send people to check out with their own eyes what I have said.

dan-slott-stalking-douglasernstblog

I watched Trump’s speech as it was happening, and my Twitter feed had plenty of stories saying an explosion occurred inside a dumpster and that many people were hurt. I’m assuming that the New Yorker with Secret Service protection and national security briefings was also up-to-date well before the rest of us.

Readers who go to Dan Slott’s Twitter feed will note that he surreptitiously erased a re-tweet that said Donald Trump was “actively rooting for the explosion in NYC to turn out to be a terrorist attack.” Telling. Very telling.

Note to Dan Slott: I do not work for a “birther” conspiracy website. Nice try. That is your new go-to distraction because you don’t know how to respond to my blog posts and you are terrified to come here (there are no slavish moderators to shield you from intelligent scrutiny).

I have worked for years for the same newspaper, with only a brief leave of absence that I won’t get into for personal reasons. I wrote stories for another website for eight months, which has contracts with literally dozens of op-ed writers. Go online and try and find one birther story by me. You can’t find them because they do not exist.

In Dan Slott’s world, I am apparently responsible for what random op-ed writers say and do. Perhaps Dan should check with President Obama’s original literary agent, who boasted that he was “born in Kenya and raised in Indonesia and Hawaii.” Hmmm. Where would anyone get the idea that Obama was born in Kenya? Weird. I suppose the Daily Caller and every other media outlet that reported on this issue are also “birthers.”

Update II: You can’t make this up. Dan Slott deleted the tweets shown above. Classic! This is why he will not come to this blog and debate me. He knows that he cannot throw his stupid and impulsive comments down an Orwellian Memory Hole.

dan-slott-kobayashi-maru

What situation could possibly be Dan Slott’s “Kobayashi Maru”? Heh. Why don’t you join the comments section and tell us about it, Dan? Or not, because you can’t delete posts when you say foolish things.

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

24 comments

  1. If you look at Trump’s comment it makes sense to tell people the truth (because the media f***ing won’t do it, hey CNN and NBC how you guys enjoying that 6% trust percentage?) they did find a bomb in a dumpster not too far away, and even though details are sketchy it does seem like there was a bomb that went off. Does it mean it was a bunch of extremist Muslims? As far as I seen no it could easily be crazy libtards or nutty rednecks we (or at least me) don’t know at the moment. Plus Trump even says after he mentions a bomb went off that he doesn’t know exactly what is going on (plus due to the level of how much everyone lies to the people, many may not trust them if they say it “was a gas line explosion”).

    You do have a point and Dan Slott is being rather hypocritical by saying Trump (a freakin candidate for President which is political meaning politicizing is the name of the game) is jumping the gun and politicizing it.

    Dan Slott is a prime example of hypocrisy.
    (Also if you see my post in older pieces it is because I like to give my two cents on subjects that I was not there when they were originally published).

    1. “If you look at Trump’s comment it makes sense to tell people the truth (because the media f***ing won’t do it, hey CNN and NBC how you guys enjoying that 6% trust percentage?)”

      Think about the video of Hillary fainting last week. If that video didn’t exist, how do you think the media would have treated anyone who said she fainted? The only reason why her campaign said she had pneumonia was because that cellphone video showed up. The media demonized anyone who said she doesn’t look well, and then she literally has to be lifted into a van after collapsing. Telling.

      “Plus Trump even says after he mentions a bomb went off that he doesn’t know exactly what is going on…”

      Exactly. All he said is that a.) a bomb went off, and b.) police are investigating the incident. Both of those things are factually correct, so it’s weird for Dan Slott and others to act like it’s some sort of “new low.” I can think of 1,000 things that Trump could have said that would have been inappropriate, but last night’s comments were incredibly tame.

      “Also if you see my post in older pieces it is because I like to give my two cents on subjects that I was not there when they were originally published.”

      Feel free to comment on older pieces. As long as it’s relevant to the post at hand, then I’m happy you’re added your opinion to the mix. 🙂

  2. A humbling thought that any Spider-Man writer needs to remember is that the character carries him. All a writer can do is improve on the serie’s foundation.

    So: The only reason Slott has Twitter followers is because he is the ASM writer. He has no resume’ to justify interest in his opinions. He isn’t an elected official, or a poli-sci professor, or an experienced journalist, or even a self-educated pundit like Limbaugh. He’s the former writer of Ren & Stimpy. If he wasn’t stewarding ASM, no one would care. I have 63 Twitter followers (woo-hoo!). If I became the writer of ASM next year, in short order I would have 163K twitter followers, even though I would be no more qualified to be “followed” than when I had 63.

    It’s the same with his ASM sales numbers. There is a rock-solid base for ASM of about 40-45K magazine direct buyers (don’t know how many digital buyers), and then a heavy variable of those who buy only if a current story-line interests them. Slott would have to write absolute drivel — 22 pages of Peter eating Ramen noodles, or something — to make a fatal dent in that base, though he’s working on it. If Marvel wasn’t propping up ASM with variant covers, stunt numbering, and special deals for buyers, his numbers would be worse.

    Slott just shouts knee-jerk slogans. But no one would be paying any attention, if he wasn’t the Spider-Man writer.

    As far as his ASM legacy goes, the track record leads me to think that other writers will rehab characters that he handled poorly, such as how Robbie Thompson turned Cindy Moon into a real character.

    1. “The only reason Slott has Twitter followers is because he is the ASM writer. He has no resume’ to justify interest in his opinions. He isn’t an elected official, or a poli-sci professor, or an experienced journalist, or even a self-educated pundit like Limbaugh. He’s the former writer of Ren & Stimpy. If he wasn’t stewarding ASM, no one would care. I have 63 Twitter followers (woo-hoo!). If I became the writer of ASM next year, in short order I would have 163K twitter followers, even though I would be no more qualified to be “followed” than when I had 63.”

      He knows this, which is why he’s had such a vice grip on the title for so long. The Amazing Spider-Man instantly brings name recognition that otherwise will not be there, and instead using his megaphone to build up the character he uses a large chunk of his time on political beefs. It’s really sad.

      “It’s the same with his ASM sales numbers. There is a rock-solid base for ASM of about 40-45K magazine direct buyers (don’t know how many digital buyers), and then a heavy variable of those who buy only if a current story-line interests them. Slott would have to write absolute drivel — 22 pages of Peter eating Ramen noodles, or something — to make a fatal dent in that base, though he’s working on it. If Marvel wasn’t propping up ASM with variant covers, stunt numbering, and special deals for buyers, his numbers would be worse.”

      Agreed. As you said, the base of support for Spider-Man is huge. This is only anecdotal, but I can see it in the search results for this blog. People actively look for news on Spider-Man, but when I write on other things like Iron Man, Black Panther, Daredevil, etc., it’s a trickle compared to Spider-Man each month.

      “Slott just shouts knee-jerk slogans. But no one would be paying any attention, if he wasn’t the Spider-Man writer.”

      Dan Slott is like the liberal version of Sean Hannity’s biggest fans and he doesn’t even know it. The one positive sign is that when I write posts like this, he’ll end up stealth-deleting certain tweets — a tacit admission that I am correct. I suppose for the most part he really just wants to sweep evidence of his own “new lows” under the table, but perhaps a small part of him slowly realizes, “Yeah, I probably shouldn’t be acting this way.”

      “As far as his ASM legacy goes, the track record leads me to think that other writers will rehab characters that he handled poorly, such as how Robbie Thompson turned Cindy Moon into a real character.”

      I checked out a couple issues of Silk and thought the same thing. The book wasn’t something I was really into, but there was a noticeable improvement in the character once she was written by someone else. She was more than just a ball of “spider-pheromones.” Sigh… Oh, Dan. Why?

  3. Precisely, Jack. At best, Slott is an average intellect but as you say his profession enables him to believe he is smarter than he actually is.

    Just compare his writing to, say, that of Roy Thomas or Jim Shooter … or Stan Lee. There is literally. No. Comparison.

  4. By their reaction you know them.

    I used to muse about. ‘what if a bomb or mass murder happened to gays for example as a result of a terrorist attack…maybe then they will get it.’

    We know what happened. Expressed disbelief, shock, anger and indignation….at Republicans. The only Republicans involved in that incident were likely closeted individuals who were afraid they would get bashed for having the wrong opinion, who ended up being victims.

    If the first reaction to an attempted murder or attack is to find a political enemy, search for things that may seem sort of inappropriate to you because you hate the guy and complain about him while the murderer dances on the graves of your friends….theirs something wrong with you.

    I didnt really think about what hillary was thinking/saying when the incident took place…but since Dan Slott wanted to opine on a guy I’m not even going to vote for….

    Reminder: Dan Slott is hoping a terrorist attack will give him a chance to virtue signal at Donald Trump’s expense…let that sick reality sink in.

    …wow, that’s a really stupid comment to make…nearly as stupid as the original. Nearly.

    Maybe we can focus on the people responsible…that would be a good start.

    1. “I didnt really think about what hillary was thinking/saying when the incident took place…but since Dan Slott wanted to opine on a guy I’m not even going to vote for….

      Reminder: Dan Slott is hoping a terrorist attack will give him a chance to virtue signal at Donald Trump’s expense…let that sick reality sink in.

      …wow, that’s a really stupid comment to make…nearly as stupid as the original. Nearly. Maybe we can focus on the people responsible…that would be a good start.”

      Boom. And again, he lacks the self-awareness to see how cringe-worthy it is for him to behave that way.

  5. The blind one sided view of Slott strikes again! I find it odd how people such as him fail to see that they make the same actions as the ones they condone. It is sad that a person that can reach thousands chooses to use his time for childish fact devoid comments “that he later has to remove to avoid embarrassment”. How many times has he been called out, yet he hides in his safe space? I challenge his followers to look beyond his Twitter feed it will show a better picture of events and Slott’s views as well as behavior.

  6. Progressives blame Republicans for everything like [edited by moderator. The analogy would have Dan Slott going into an apoplectic rage].

    @Rev_Jack_Brooks

    1. “OK, I tried to think of something else as illustrative, but couldn’t. What’s another classic example of ridiculous scape-goating?”

      We’ll just leave this one with “ridiculous scape-goating.”

  7. Dumpsters usually don’t have gas lines running through them, so speculating that a “bomb” exploded was not exactly a wild flight of fancy.

    Will Slott want his followers to “politicize the f*ck” out of his murder if he gets blown up with an IED made from a pressure cooker? Or stabbed to death? Or run over with a truck? And if the killer turns out to be an Arab immigrant (or anchor baby) who swore allegiance to ISIS or Al Qaeda?

    The cognitive dissonance of the administration and the MSM is staggering. After the San Bernardino massacre, the media reported that the motive was “not clear” but that the Inland Regional Center was “only a few blocks away from a Planned Parenthood clinic.” (The actual distance was 1.5 miles.) And after the Orlando rampage, the president of the Human Rights Campaign, being interviewed on MSNBC, blamed it on a “deranged individual” who was “taught to hate by a preacher on Sunday morning.”

    Re: the 9-11 ceremony, it’s telling that reporters and camera crews were all over the place, but the only footage of Hillary Clinton’s collapse was recorded by a bystander (not a professional journalist), presumably with a cell phone camcorder. And, when the subject could no longer be ignored, the MSM scrambled to put a positive spin on it, first claiming heat exhaustion (temp was 77), then claiming pneumonia, which she was determined to “power through.”

    Given the Clintons’ track record, I won’t be surprised when the person who recorded that video is found dead, shot five times in the back of the head with a .338 Magnum rifle. I won’t even be surprised when the official verdict is suicide.

  8. I cannot wait for the political season to be over. It seems like everyone is more interested in sliming the other side than in actually proving their qualifications, presenting their platform, and how they plan to run their administration (I think Clinton may have presented a few points, I know that Trump won’t say anything until he’s getting elected; I’d like more details from both, either way).

    (A little off topic, Doug, but I wasn’t sure where else to put this: A member of a forum I was hanging around on found this interesting article [http://www.bleedingcool.com/2016/09/18/dan-slott-says-retailers-havent-ordered-enough-copies-of-clone-conspiracy/] Appaerently, the gist of it is that as of the article’s writing, the store sales for the “Clone Conspiracy” event were lower than expected, and Slott made his thoughts on that known. I’d be really interested to hear your analysis, since I know next to nothing about how comic stores order their materials, so I can’t tell if Slott’s reasoning is accurate or if he’s missing the most likely reason.)

    1. “Appaerently, the gist of it is that as of the article’s writing, the store sales for the “Clone Conspiracy” event were lower than expected, and Slott made his thoughts on that known. I’d be really interested to hear your analysis, since I know next to nothing about how comic stores order their materials, so I can’t tell if Slott’s reasoning is accurate or if he’s missing the most likely reason.”

      I’m glad to talk about stuff like this, WebLurker. I’ll know more about the business side of this issue once I talk to my local comic shop guy, but here is my instinctual response:

      Do you remember the “Preview” books that both Marvel and DC put out this summer, probably around May? (I’m not sure exactly when it was, but we’ll just go with that.) Ask your own comic shop owner if you doubt me on this, but DC’s previews had all sorts of details about what would be going on, who was writing each title, etc. Marvel’s “Preview” was essentially just a bunch of cover pages. The owner of my comic shop called it a “poster book.” He was pissed. He’s like, “How am I supposed to know what to order? How am I going to sell this?”

      Yep. That’s right. He couldn’t. There was nothing to go on other than Marvel’s word that they would put out “super-duper-awesome-gotta-order-tons-of-it” products. But…that’s not how the real world works.

      Here’s the other thing that is weird to me: Marvel just got done with a big event, and now it’s got this giant ASM event…that has a “core” outside ASM. Brilliant! Or not.

      And finally, if I was on a tight budget and I went all in for Civil War II, where am I going to get the cash for Clone Conspiracy? I’d be kind of tapped out, and I’m not going to rush to buy anything Spider-Man-related with clones. If Marvel has a business model that requires guilting people into buying large numbers of a book, sight-unseen, for the first issue…then something is wrong.

  9. From what I’ve heard over the years, LCS owners gauge purchases by years of past patterns, but also by current “buzz” (live and online) and pull requests. If they start getting a lot of “Don’t bother pulling this one for me, Joe” from steady customers, they’ll adjust down. Store owners must be hearing a big yawn out of steady ASM customers toward “Clone Conspiracy”, so the buyers are adjusting.

    In contrast, it won’t surprise me if the new Renew Your Vows series gets high orders, because the buzz on that series is heating up, and loads of people want a married Peter and MJ back.

    1. “Store owners must be hearing a big yawn out of steady ASM customers toward ‘Clone Conspiracy’, so the buyers are adjusting.”

      I can only speak to what my LCS owner says, and everything is about DC Rebirth lately. That’s doing gangbusters for him, while people are just kind of tired of Marvel. Civil War II has not sold well, and Marvel’s overall business model is pushing readers over to DC.

  10. — Do you remember the “Preview” books that both Marvel and DC put out this summer, probably around May? (I’m not sure exactly when it was, but we’ll just go with that.) Ask your own comic shop owner if you doubt me on this, but DC’s previews had all sorts of details about what would be going on, who was writing each title, etc. Marvel’s “Preview” was essentially just a bunch of cover pages. The owner of my comic shop called it a “poster book.” He was pissed. He’s like, “How am I supposed to know what to order? How am I going to sell this?” —

    I’m not sure if there’s a local comic store in town here, but I’m going to be checking (I’m seriously considering getting a copy of the first RYV issue. Although I doubt I can afford to do that on a regular basis — esp. since I’m planning to get the series’ trade paperbacks for sure — It’d be fun to have a copy of an actual issue and would support the series more, esp. since I think it’s going to need it.)

    I didn’t see the DC one, but I did see the Marvel one. I don’t blame your store’s owner for not liking it. While the artwork was nice, I wanted to know about the story premises, too. Esp. since some of the titles are not of well-known characters. A “Daredevil” series is self-explanatory and could possibly get away with just a teaser poster. But I’d never heard of stuff like “Foolkiller” or “Solo,” and the picture alone didn’t give me any reason to want and check it out.

    Even the RYV series (something that I’d been wanting ever since the original came out) seemed miss-marketed; the ad showed the characters as they appeared in the original series, but we now know that it’s actually a reboot of Slott’s story. While I have no problems with that, I was lead to believe that Conway’s story was a direct sequel, which means that I’ve had to adjust my expectations and wish that they’d been upfront about this from the beginning.

    — Yep. That’s right. He couldn’t. There was nothing to go on other than Marvel’s word that they would put out “super-duper-awesome-gotta-order-tons-of-it” products. But…that’s not how the real world works. —

    Sounds like the traces I’ve heard of the “Clone Conspiracy” marketing and interviews. “It’s going to be awesome, you can’t miss it, big things are happening, it’ll change stuff forever” (again)*, yadda, yadda, yadda.” While I will admit that I haven’t been playing close attention to the publicity, it feels like to me that Slott is more interested in saying that it’ll be awesome, rather than telling my why it is and why I should care about it.

    *Until the time comes for it to be reset.

    Conversely, that CBR RYV interview with Conway and Stegman early on set up that not only did they want to create an unique series with characters they loved working with, but they also had planned out how they were going to write the characters and what the interactions should be, and had some specific plots in mind. To me, between the two, Conway and Stegman seemed like the people who really cared about their project and were investing the time to make it worth the reader’s interest and five bucks.

    — Here’s the other thing that is weird to me: Marvel just got done with a big event, and now it’s got this giant ASM event…that has a “core” outside ASM. Brilliant! Or not. —

    How many readers even like events? This maybe because I’m a very occasional reader and extremely selective, but I don’t like them. As far as comics are concerned, I don’t care about what happening elsewhere from Spider-Man, and don’t want to have to read half a dozen other series to make sense of something.

    (And why isn’t Clone Conspiracy” just part of the regular ASM? It’d make it easier for the readers to follow, esp. if it’s supposed to be ASM.)

    — And finally, if I was on a tight budget and I went all in for Civil War II, where am I going to get the cash for Clone Conspiracy? I’d be kind of tapped out, and I’m not going to rush to buy anything Spider-Man-related with clones. If Marvel has a business model that requires guilting people into buying large numbers of a book, sight-unseen, for the first issue…then something is wrong. —

    Interesting thought. My first assumption was that “Clone Conspiracy” wasn’t not being ordered that much because there had been a drop in demand for ASM (which would be Slott’s problem). (I’ve heard conflicting opinions; that Slott’s ASM work is in a selling slump on one hand, with others saying it’s the only comic competing with DC and still selling well, so I have no idea who’s right.)

    1. “How many readers even like events? This maybe because I’m a very occasional reader and extremely selective, but I don’t like them. As far as comics are concerned, I don’t care about what happening elsewhere from Spider-Man, and don’t want to have to read half a dozen other series to make sense of something.”

      Good question. From my conversations with the owner of my LCS, there is a “bump” in sales across all the titles for event tie-ins. He just isn’t sure if the bump justifies the headaches it causes for owers in terms of ordering, and the readers in terms of getting annoyed that their book can’t really build momentum. It’s another one of those things where Marvel goes for short-term gains at the expense of long-term loyalty.

      My LCS owner makes a good point that there is zero reason certain book must be tied into the event, but yet Marvel does it anyway. He says (and I agree with him), that certain titles should just concentrate on telling good tales that are not connected to the event. It must be very frustrating to be a writer at Marvel because every few months you have to shoehorn “event” plot lines into your book and you’re handcuffed as to where you can go with the character.

      “Interesting thought. My first assumption was that ‘Clone Conspiracy’ wasn’t not being ordered that much because there had been a drop in demand for ASM (which would be Slott’s problem). (I’ve heard conflicting opinions; that Slott’s ASM work is in a selling slump on one hand, with others saying it’s the only comic competing with DC and still selling well, so I have no idea who’s right.)”

      If Marvel is slumping as a whole, then that should serve as a giant red flag to the editors that they are doing something wrong. It’s been pointed out here before — Spider-Man has a rock solid fan base in the tens-of-thousands. They are die-hards. Spider-Man and Batman are two of the biggest superheroes of all time. It would be really hard to totally tank to the book (and Marvel has tried throughout the years). Even if ASM is selling well for today’s standards, it still seems to be on incredibly shaky ground. Check out Stillanerd’s regular sales post over at Whatever a Spider Can. He explains all that stuff pretty well.

  11. Not sure where to put this, Doug, but it looks like Joss Whedon has created an anti-Trump ad.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2016/09/21/avengers-stars-team/

    I suppose he needs something to do now that he’s no longer involved with Marvel, but still, it’s pathetic. They don’t mention Trump directly, but Don Cheadle’s comments in particular leave no doubt as to who they’re aiming it at.

    Also, you gotta love it when people like Nathan Fillion appear in stuff like this. He’s Canadian, for God’s sake, so what the hell is he doing telling America who to vote for? There may or may not be a few Brits in there, too; I didn’t watch the whole thing.

    1. “Not sure where to put this, Doug, but it looks like Joss Whedon has created an anti-Trump ad.”

      No problem, Carl. Stay tuned! I’ll be writing something on this within the next day or two. Thanks for sending stuff like this along. I always appreciate it.

    2. “No problem, Carl. Stay tuned! I’ll be writing something on this within the next day or two. Thanks for sending stuff like this along. I always appreciate it.”

      You’re welcome. Another actor I spotted in there was Jesse “Sit Down” Williams, who went on that insane pro-BLM rant at the BET Awards over the summer. Not surprised to see that clown at all.

      Apparently, Whedon (who likes to lecture Americans about “evil” rich people even though he comes from a pretty affluent background himself; his parents were involved in the Jim Henson Company at one time and he grew up in a wealthy Manhattan neighborhood.) also created a Super PAC for Hillary Clinton. He must really be bitter that he’s not getting any directing jobs these days. You’d think that being chased off Twitter by SJWs last year would have caused him to reconsider his beliefs, but I guess not.

      Strong in Whedon, the hypocrisy is.

    3. “Apparently, Whedon (who likes to lecture Americans about “evil” rich people even though he comes from a pretty affluent background himself; his parents were involved in the Jim Henson Company at one time and he grew up in a wealthy Manhattan neighborhood.”

      I remember hearing that he grew up in an pretty well-off family, but I didn’t know the details about the Jim Henson Company. Interesting!

      The piece is up. 🙂 Ask and you shall receive: Robert Downey Jr. and friends tell U.S. to vote for woman who called black kids ‘super predators,’ was excoriated by FBI

    4. “I remember hearing that he grew up in an pretty well-off family, but I didn’t know the details about the Jim Henson Company. Interesting!”

      Additionally, his grandfather was a screenwriter for shows such as “The Donna Reed Show,” “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “Andy Griffith” and “Leave it to Beaver,” so Whedon’s never exactly been hurting for money. You gotta love the hypocrisy of a rich guy bemoaning the fact that he’s rich. If I were him, I’d enjoy every minute of it.

      It’s also strange that this ad dropped the same day I started watching Buffy again on my DVR. Oh, well, I still like the show. Whedon made it before he went Koo-Koo for Cocoa Puffs.

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