John Kerry: I was for bombing Syria before I was against it — so gas away, Assad

Britain Syria

John Kerry was for bombing Syria before he was against it. It was just about a year ago that the Secretary of State said that history would judge us all “extraordinarily harshly” if something (i.e., a military strike) wasn’t done about the Assad regime gassing its own citizens to death.

“Now, we know that after a decade of conflict, the American people are tired of war. Believe me, I am, too. But fatigue does not absolve us of our responsibility. Just longing for peace does not necessarily bring it about. And history would judge us all extraordinarily harshly if we turned a blind eye to a dictator’s wanton use of weapons of mass destruction against all warnings, against all common understanding of decency,” — (John Kerry, Aug. 20, 2013).

Today? Well, Chlorine is bad but it’s not really that bad. And, well, we don’t really want to be “pinned down” with actually having to do anything with the 150,000 dead bodies (and counting) in Syria. So maybe someone else will figure it out. Someday.

Here’s what the guy who voted for war spending in Iraq and Afghanistan before voting against it said in London May 15:

“With respect to the [chemical weapons] and what the consequences are, it has been made clear by President Obama and others that use would result in consequences. We’re not going to pin ourselves down to a precise time, date, manner of action, but there will be consequences if it were to be proven, including, I might say, things that are way beyond our control and have nothing to do with us. But the International Criminal Court and others are free to hold him accountable. And as you know, we have a resolution that will be in front of the United Nations with respect to culpability for crimes against humanity, atrocities in the course of this conflict. So one way or the other, there will be accountability,” (John Kerry, May 15, 2014).

As radio host Chris Plante said: Chlorine takes the “red” out of red lines!

Kerry Football

Why is it okay to murder your own citizens with bullets, bombs and Chlorine gas, but it’s not okay to do so with VX nerve agent? Why did the U.S. bomb the hell out of Libya for “humanitarian” purposes, but then does nothing in Syria?

Politicians like John Kerry make the world a more dangerous place because they perpetually engage in doublespeak. They take every side on an issue, act on what is politically expedient and then (if they have the right letter next to their name) count on the media to throw all the contradictory statements down the Memory Hole.

What makes matters worse is that dictators like Bashar al Assad and former KGB agents like Vladimir Putin know that men like John Kerry are generally unprincipled buffoons, so they act in ways they otherwise wouldn’t; they know they can get away with it (e.g., the annexation of Crimea).

When John Kerry says things like Bashar al Assad gassing his own people was the “straw that broke the camel’s back,” the world’s worst actors just laugh because they know that all they have to do is feign interest in a “deal” of some kind to get men  like John Kerry to blubber themselves into a new position.

It isn’t often that dictators around the world get to do whatever the heck they want and know that they can do so, for all intents and purposes, with impunity. Before President Obama leaves office, expect a few more surprises from the usual cast of international thugs and lowlifes because they will want to push the envelope as far as possible before the 2016 presidential election.

Place yourself in the shoes of Nicholas Maduro, Bashar al Assad, Vladimir Putin, Xi Jinping or Kim Jong-un. What would you do? Answer that question and then ask yourself another: How has “leading from behind” worked for the United States since 2008?

 

 

Escape from Camp 14: A haunting tale of North Korea’s gulags

Escape from Camp 14 is a must read. This one book could wipe away years of brainwashing by cultural relativists leading discussion groups inside college classrooms.

Where does one begin when reviewing Blaine Harden’s Escape from Camp 14? The story of Shin In Geun’s (now Shin Dong-hyuk) life inside a North Korean gulag is one not many people in free societies can ever really fathom, which is probably why the book is a harder sell than it needs to be. Americans think torture is something they see in a movie theater while chomping on overpriced popcorn, or if they’re more socially conscious they might ramble on about water boarding terrorists like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. In both cases they miss the mark completely.

Conservatives are often laughed at and ridiculed for speaking about certain countries in terms of good and evil, but the truth of the matter is that good and evil exist, and perhaps there is no closer embodiment of hell on earth than North Korea.

Shin’s story revolves around his life at Camp 14, a “total control” camp, which meant he was born there and he would die there. His earliest memories were of watching executions—mouths filled with rocks and bound tight (we can’t have anyone criticizing the Dear Leader in their last moments) before rounds of bullets blew their heads off. Camp 14 had a prison camp within a prison camp (where Shin was tortured). Sons and daughters are taught to snitch on their parents, snitch on their peers and to live in a constant state of paranoia. Women are raped and then executed when they become pregnant. Starving kids like Shin find themselves picking undigested kernels of corn from animal feces…to eat. In short, the North Korean regime seeks to strip every ounce of humanity from its citizens, and they have shown that they are willing to go to great lengths to succeed.

Fear societies, despite their best efforts to turn people into animals, can not succeed.  The human spirit will often find a way to break free. People are not meant to be cattle, and they will either unshackle their spirit through suicide…or die in the pursuit of freedom.

What is most interesting about Escape from Camp 14 is that even though Shin was born and raised in an environment of pure evil, he seemed to know deep down that there was a right from wrong. Looking back on his actions now he struggles with the repercussions (e.g., the execution of his mother and brother…and quite possibly his father), but the free, adult Shin is too harsh of a critic of the 13 year old version of his imprisoned self.

For example, should Shin feel guilty for having to climb over the electrified, charred remains of his friend in order to obtain freedom?

Without hesitation, Shin crawled over his friend’s body, using it as a kind of insulating pad. As he squirmed through the fence, Shin could feel the current. The soles of his feet felt as though needles were stabbing them.

Shin was nearly through the fence when his lower legs slipped off Park’s torso and came into direct contact, through the two pairs of pant he was wearing, with the bottom strand. Voltage from the wire caused severe burns from his ankles to his knees. The wounds bled for weeks. But it would be a couple of hours before Shin noticed how badly he had been injured.

What he remembers most clearly about crawling through the fence was that Park’s body smelled like it was burning.

There is a reason why Shin still wakes up from nightmares, screaming as his mind conjures up images of his dead mother, brother and friend. The guilt that he feels, however, is misplaced, as it is the tyrannical North Korean regime’s seeds that sprout in his mind. They are responsible for the heartache and pain Shin feels, not him.

We all have a purpose in life, and I can’t help but think that Shin’s was to break free from North Korea and tell the world what is truly going on inside their border. If you get a chance, pick up a copy of Escape from Camp 14. You’ll be glad you did.

Carter Finds U.S. Human Rights Violations in North Korea. Seriously.

I always thought former U.S. presidents had Secret Service agents with them. Apparently not, because Jimmy Carter is a danger to himself and his country. And yet, they keep letting him out the front door.  The former Peanut Farmer in Chief shouldn’t be allowed to cross the street alone, never mind a trip to North Korea. Why? Because he’s one of the few people alive who can go to a country with modern-day gulags and return to find U.S. human rights violations!

According to the 39th President of the United States, not giving food to North Korea is tantamount to human rights violations.  I suppose the logic goes, that if we give Kim Jong Il  enough food some of it will actually make it to starving people. I’m sure the dictator’s inner circle of police state overseers get a good laugh out of that one.

Listening to Jimmy Carter makes me think of Kang Chol-Hwan, author of The Aquariums of Pyongyang, and a gulag survivor who risked his life to escape to South Korea. He wrote:

During the first days of my detention, I met a kid who wore black socks. At least that’s what I thought until I realized his socks in fact were an incredible layer of dirt and grime. I, too, would one day wear such “socks.” I’m still grateful to my grandmother for forcing us to wash our hands and feet whenever we had a little time and energy. It was a way of resisting the imposed conditions and the feelings of exhaustion and self-loathing they engendered (The Aquariums of Pyongyang, 74).

I’m guessing Jimmy Carter wasn’t allowed to see Kang Chol-Hwan’s North Korea. That would be the one with half-delirious, unwashed women who eat “nothing” and sleep outside. Instead, he was probably treated to kindergarten kids that play guitar like they’ve practiced with pistols pressed to their foreheads.

Jimmy Carter is part of a rare breed: those who could go into a black hole, where the “well off” and the tortured both look like zombies, and hold a press conference that places the blame at the feet of his home country. Is it possible that the lint from decades of  sweater-wearing worked its way up into his brain and now prevents him from seeing the difference between free societies and fear societies? Did he drown in his culpability for the disaster that was Operation Eagle Claw, and suffer brain damage as a result of a lack of oxygen? It’s tough to pull punches and play Mr. Nice Guy when you’re dealing with a man who can’t even tongue lash Kim Jong Il.

And now, back to our regularly scheduled program: The Walking Dead…I mean, North Korean Kindergartners.