Chelsea Cain serves up Marvel’s outrage du jour, only proves she’s fed up with Twitter trolls like the rest of us

By now you may have heard about the social justice warrior OUTRAGE at the alleged harassment and general online abuse of Mockingbird writer Chelsea Cain.

Cain wrote the book from a feminist perspective, apparently, and the title culminated with this cover:

The Daily Dot reports (among many other outlets) that Cain quit Twitter after getting fed up with all the invective:

This cover, drawn by Joelle Jones, provoked a barrage of unpleasant messages to Chelsea Cain on Twitter. In a series of tweets that have since been deleted with the deactivation of her account, Cain wrote, “I’m in my office dealing w/ misogynist bullies on Twitter” instead of spending time with her 11-year-old daughter, adding, “I’m just done here. I’m amazed at the cruelty comics brings out in people.”

The Twitter campaign #StandWithChelseaCain got underway, with folks like above Nick BOOson participating. Here’s more:

Comics writers Ed Brubaker on Twitter, and Frank Tieri on Facebook, offered Cain words of support.

However, at least one Twitterite began asking questions about all these abusive tweets Cain supposedly had received:

That’s author Rob Kroese who correctly noted in subsequent tweets that just because Cain deleted her Twitter account doesn’t mean all the (alleged) harassing tweets will disappear as a result.

And then lo and behold — it seems a mountain was made out of the proverbial molehill:

I loved Twitter.  I made friends.  I maintained friendships.  I was delighted when I got to exchange texts with my favorite podcaster or a TV actor or writer I love.  And I had a huge network of other comic book industry professionals who offered me daily support and invaluable advice.  I mentored teenagers and exchanged tweets with readers and tried to be funny sometimes.

But know that I did not leave Twitter because of rape threats or because someone had posted my address, or any of the truly vile tactics you hear about.  I left Twitter because of the ordinary daily abuse that I decided I didn’t want to live with anymore.

Emphasis mine. So what we ended up with was a manufactured social justice warrior controversy over a (female) writer vamoosing Twitter because she had had it with its general negativity.

I don’t fault Cain whatsoever for what she did. Twitter, and social media in general, can be a pretty discouraging place if you don’t have a tough exterior. She had little to do with the hyperbolic tweets  which appeared faster than a Quicksilver dump following the announcement her resignation from the platform. But for SJWs, the fact that Cain imbued Mockingbird with feminism, and the fact that she is a woman, well, they just KNEW she had to have been subjected Christian Szell-like torture!

And need I mention that that of which Cain got weary is what many comics creators themselves subject their fans to day in and day out? How many words on that subject have Doug, Avi, and myself written over the years?

I asked Ed Brubaker about just this in a reply to his Cain-supporting tweet:

There has been no response from Ed after those queries, seven and a half hours ago at press time.

 

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