Marvel’s Civil War II #6 is out, and Brian Michael Bendis could no longer contain himself. It was only a matter of time before his cautionary tale about racial profiling featured a “Hands up, don’t shoot!” or an “I can’t breathe” moment, but on some level it’s hard to be too annoyed because it was so predictable.

Anyway, check out my latest YouTube video and let me know what you think about the issue in the comments section below. It seems as though Marvel is so obsessed with scoring political points these days that it has forgotten that many readers turn to superhero stories as a form of escapism.

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

9 comments

    1. That would be interesting…King’s Batman is very divisive so far, but a new arc started two weeks ago with an interesting angle with Catwoman for the cliffhanger, it might be a good opportunity to start reading.

      I’m kind of surprised you don’t review a lot of Wonder Woman, given Ruka’s agenda with her, although to be fair it has’nt quite played out too much yet in the books (well, maybe a little in the Year One issues)

      Man, should I give Guardians 2 my money if Quill’s supporting Stalin-esque views? Probably because Marvel Studios are thankfully distant from the publishing wing. Sad to see Star Lord used by Bendis in this way.

  1. Maybe Marvel should consider the impact of this behavior on sales, they are getting beat down by DC right now. People are tired of political cheap shots and agendas.

    How hard is it to just write a story and keep things centered or personal bias out?

    Seems impossible for Marvel and DC is not perfect either.

    1. Zariusii, what did you think of Tom King’s “Vision”? I thought the series was one of the best things Marvel have published in a long time. Beautifully written and visually engaging.

      I’m enjoying his “Batman” run very much. Would love to see him write “ASM” one day. 🕷

  2. Maybe Marvel is being so political because of how political society is becoming? A lot of times, fiction and art will reflect the way world is viewed. Today in the States, there is a lot of political and racial tension, 2016 is the new 1969 and all that (at the very least, there is that perception). So, while you could argue that the comic writers are pushing an agenda in their writings, it would stand to reason that recent events have also been influencing the way things go, as well.

    (In other words, I’m not really surprised that comics are touching on recent events and/or our perception of recent events. Is it a good thing? That’s the question the reader has to ask.)

    1. “Maybe Marvel is being so political because of how political society is becoming? A lot of times, fiction and art will reflect the way world is viewed. Today in the States, there is a lot of political and racial tension, 2016 is the new 1969 and all that (at the very least, there is that perception). So, while you could argue that the comic writers are pushing an agenda in their writings, it would stand to reason that recent events have also been influencing the way things go, as well.”

      No one is arguing with the idea that an era’s political climate affects the fiction that is created. Yes, that’s obvious. What guys like me are saying (and have said repeatedly over the years), is the following:

      1. Marvel always comes at its politics from a left-wing point of view (e.g., readers can expect hack ideas like big, bad racist ‘Americops,’ but they will never see a terrorist named ‘Koranus.’) Note: I would not be in favor of right-wing hackery, either.
      2. Marvel cannot be subtle about its politics. Readers get “I can’t breathe” in a racial profiling story, but you would never see the above example of “Koranus” yelling “Allahu Akbar!” as he self-detonates inside, say, a rebuilt Stark Tower.

      The point is this: Stories can broach contemporary political issues, but they should really do so in broader terms. Writers should essentially be looking at these projects from 30,000-feet in the air instead of ground-level with the petty politics that usually accompanies the latter approach.

      Marvel is making the conscious decision to alienate potential customers with legitimate points of view. That is wrong. That is divisive. And that is why its current business model is an absolute disgrace.

  3. I’d prefer they keep politics out of comics, personally. I read comics to escape the real world, not have more of it shoved into my face.

    “. So, while you could argue that the comic writers are pushing an agenda in their writings, it would stand to reason that recent events have also been influencing the way things go, as well.”

    They are pushing an agenda, and have been for years. At some point, they decided that was more important than telling a decent story. It’s hard to say when that actually began, although I first noticed it in 2006 when they published “Civil War.” I think it began much earlier, though.

    “Today in the States, there is a lot of political and racial tension.”

    Which largely didn’t exist until Obama, the race baiter-in-chief, came to office. He and his allies have done a lot to damage race relations in this country, by dividing people among racial lines. When I was growing up, I was taught to be color-blind, to judge people by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. This is a philosophy I still follow. Nowadays, kids are being taught that line of thinking is “racist.” You can’t make it up.

    “(In other words, I’m not really surprised that comics are touching on recent events and/or our perception of recent events. Is it a good thing? That’s the question the reader has to ask.)”

    My answer is no. I would like it if they dropped the political storylines and resumed telling stories where good triumphs over evil, there are no superheroes making deals with devils, etc. Besides, telling stories that tie in with current events become dated within a few years, when the next social justice outrage de jour makes the rounds on social media and Marvel decides to put it in their comics just so they can appease the Tumblr crowd.

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