Omar Mateen

Omar Mateen of St. Lucie County, Fla., massacred 50 people and wounded 53 others at a gay nightclub in Orlando on Saturday. The St. Lucie County man had pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group and was previously investigated by the FBI. Those are the kind of details that rightly prompt discussions on homeland security and radical Islamic terrorism in objective circles.

On Twitter, however, the online mobs have directed their rage and anger at other targets: Christians and the National Rifle Association. Seriously.

Chase Strangio Orlando terror tweet

Yes, that’s right, a guy who pledged allegiance to ISIS before unleashing a terror attack like those in Paris or Brussels was somehow driven by “the Christian Right” to slaughter gay people — according to the Twitter mob.

Scott Weiner Orlando terror tweet

Scott Wiener, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, wants everyone to know that “Radical Christianity more than holds its own” when compared to the Islamic terrorists throwing gay men off tall buildings in Syria or mowing down innocent civilians around the world.

Islamic State gay execution

Finally, the Orlando-terror Twitter stream was filled with individuals like Deni Rosenberg, who want the world to believe that “good guys” with guns would not have saved countless lives inside Pulse Nightclub — despite the fact that it took a S.W.A.T. team (i.e., good guys with guns), to end the bloody standoff.

Deni Rosenberg Orlando tweet

Every time Islamic radicals kill civilians in western countries, the response by politically-correct activists is to proclaim, “this has nothing to do with Islam” — while simultaneously sliming Christians and gun-owners as the catalyst for terror. Oddly enough, these very same activists wonder why presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is popular with millions of Americans.

Pulse Attack CNN screenshot

If Donald Trump is elected the 45th president of the United States, then pollsters should ask about this moment in history. Millions of voters’ decision will be galvanized within the next week, and it is my opinion (as a Giant Meteor of Death supporter) that a cacophony of politically-correct platitudes will push them into Mr. Trump’s camp.

Giant Meteor 2016

Editor’s Note:

Regular readers know that this blog has been nominated for a Hugo Award. This morning I saw a trackback in my WordPress stats to one voter’s critique of my writing. I fell into a “No Award” category based on my “weaker” political fare. An example of my “weaker” efforts was a Dec. 12, 2015, post that warned of “Shariah Police” legally patrolling the streets of Germany — and how Christianity differs from Islam. (I’m not sure how my thoughts on Shariah law have anything to do with The Amazing Spider-Man, but I digress.)

“Ernst’s more political/social commentary posts are much weaker but the guy is saddled with having to defend poorly thought out positions,’ the writer said. “Overall, a bit middling with high variability. There are many better writers out there but as there is a danger of political bias on my part leading me to undervalue the rest of his writing I strongly considered putting him above No Award. However, even the best of his writing just isn’t up to award-worthy.”

Here is my “poorly thought out position” from that post: Shariah Law is dangerous (e.g., it allows for the execution of gay people, domestic terrorism, etc.), and 2 million refugees from the Middle East and North Africa will pose significant security problems for German authorities in the years to come.

Let me ask my Magic 8 Ball if “political bias” was at play with that “No Award” vote.

Answer: “As I see it, yes.”

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

31 comments

  1. It’s so easy to dismiss in entirety what people put on Twitter as a source of worthwhile discussion. The platform invites opinions that aren’t well considered to be shared with a mass audience. I consider that a bad thing.

    There’s so much we do not know about the murderer yet, and it confuses everyone’s understanding to jump to conclusions. He pledged to ISIS, but he was also born and raised here. We don’t know what radicalized him, or if his “pledge” was sincere. His father (Afghani immigrant) made a statement about him having a violent reaction to recently seeing men kissing. We don’t know to what degree his homophobia affected his decisions. Was his hatred fostered or supported by his religion, or is that unrelated? Did he have unresolved attractions to men himself? His ex-wife (the marriage didn’t last long) said he had mental problems, and physically abused her almost daily. He’s young enough for a first emergence of schizophrenia. And, by having worked for a security company, he had easier access to the murder weapon. But we don’t know anything about the adequacy of their background checks.

    I think we need to have ways to know more about the people we entrust with, and allow access to military-styled weapons. But that’s MY fear, my bias. I know it might not apply in this case, and I will wait to hear more before forming a solid opinion. I wish more people valued thinking twice before speaking, or tweeting.

    1. “There’s so much we do not know about the murderer yet, and it confuses everyone’s understanding to jump to conclusions. He pledged to ISIS, but he was also born and raised here. We don’t know what radicalized him, or if his ‘pledge’ was sincere.”

      Why would you question a man’s pledge to ISIS when he was previously investigated by the FBI for terror ties and he walked into a gay nightclub and executed 50 people?

      “His ex-wife (the marriage didn’t last long) said he had mental problems, and physically abused her almost daily. He’s young enough for a first emergence of schizophrenia.”

      ISIS, a terror group that literally takes sex slaves, also abuses women. In fact, the group executes women who refuse their rapists.

      Is it more likely that this guy had schizophrenia, or that his support for ISIS gave him an intellectual green light to beat his wife for not doing the laundry?

      “I think we need to have ways to know more about the people we entrust with, and allow access to military-styled weapons. But that’s MY fear, my bias.”

      How do you define “military-style weapons”? There are plenty hunting rifles that are deadlier than an AR-15, but they don’t look black and scary…so terrorists, suicidal nuts, and others who are prone to go on rampages don’t gravitate to them. The guy could have done just as much damage with two handguns and enough ammunition.

    2. Doug, you are making a tremendous assumption about the FBI’s level of previous knowledge, which is leading you to jump to distorted conclusions.

      I just saw (on ABC) assertions from supposed FBI sources saying they were aware of him, because he had Afghan parents, but that their previous investigations for radical ties were inconclusive, and hadn’t turned up anything solid. They are re-investigating him NOW, after the fact. That speaks to what I already said about the adequacy of background checks for someone working in security.

      I’m not a gun guy, so you’ll have to allow me confusion about what is or isn’t a military weapon, or how much damage can be done with what. Don’t know, don’t particularly care. The specific choice of weapon isn’t the issue to me. I’m more concerned with whether this guy should have been cleared to use weapons as a part of his job.

      What exactly are we supposed to do, just assume every male Muslim under 30 born in the USA is a likely terrorist? We don’t have anything close to the police resources that would require, and there’s that pesky Constitution in the way of investigating native-born citizens. It takes warrants etc. Not something you can do overnight.

      So again, I’m going to wait and see what the FBI and other police uncover, before forming an opinion, and I certainly won’t grant credence to anyone not directly in on the investigations thinking they know exactly what went on.

    3. “Doug, you are making a tremendous assumption about the FBI’s level of previous knowledge, which is leading you to jump to distorted conclusions. I just saw (on ABC) assertions from supposed FBI sources saying they were aware of him, because he had Afghan parents, but that their previous investigations for radical ties were inconclusive, and hadn’t turned up anything solid. They are re-investigating him NOW, after the fact. That speaks to what I already said about the adequacy of background checks for someone working in security.”

      In your own comments you mention that law enforcement agencies have limited resources, correct? Given that, you have to ask yourself what the heck this guy did to get on the FBI’s radar. You don’t just get the FBI’s attention for being a Muslim. I’m very interested in seeing what details come out about this guy in the weeks ahead.

      “What exactly are we supposed to do, just assume every male Muslim under 30 born in the USA is a likely terrorist?”

      No. Law enforcement just needs to continue monitoring social media accounts where extremists congregate. They must keep an eye on radical groups within the U.S., etc. There are different layers to any anti-terrorism strategy, and for the most part I think law enforcement knows what it is doing. My problem is with the concerted effort in some circles to say terrorism in the name of Islam has nothing to do with Islam. It’s completely divorced from reality to say that and downright dangerous. The FBI should not distribute its anti-terrorism resources equally among, say, Mormon Temples and Mosques.

      “So again, I’m going to wait and see what the FBI and other police uncover, before forming an opinion, and I certainly won’t grant credence to anyone not directly in on the investigations thinking they know exactly what went on.”

      In general it is good to wait for facts to come in before coming to a definitive conclusion. I’m not going to knock you for that. I just think the probability that we’re dealing with a schizophrenic man instead of an ISIS-supporting terrorist is slim.

  2. Thanks for the link. Yes, I think that piece was weak writing because it lacked cohesion. You took it as read that it was outrageous that a German court would find that some religious extremists (specifically Islamic extremists) could dress up in hi-vis vests, call themselves “police” and hassle people. You asked rhetorically how people would have reacted if they had called themselves “Jesus police” – the odds are that would also be legal in Germany.

    Dressing up and being an arsehole is largely not illegal – perhaps it should be but that isn’t an idea you examined.

    What is notably different between your comics-review writing and your political writing is in the former you critically examine ideas and attempt to persuade, whereas in the political writing you take everything as axiomatic. Are their communities/groups of Christians who organise themselves and actively harass people? Sure. Do you think such groups are different from the “Shariah Police” group in your article? – obviously, you do, but rather than say why you just assert such groups don’t exist. Good writing anticipates counter-arguments and counter positions and it connects ideas logically and thematically. That piece didn’t.

    Of course, that standard that I’m saying is award worthy isn’t easy. I certainly don’t write to that standard and lots of political things that I write just blithely assume that the people reading already agree with me. However, when considering the quality of a writer for an award it isn’t on the basis of “best polemic”.

    1. “What is notably different between your comics-review writing and your political writing is in the former you critically examine ideas and attempt to persuade, whereas in the political writing you take everything as axiomatic.”

      It seems rather odd to add so much weight to my political opinions when I was nominated for my “Fan” work on science-fiction writing, movies, etc. Regardless, what’s more likely: That the guy who has a section of his blog dedicated to the “Conservative Crisis” would sink my nomination because of his own political bias, or that I “take everything as axiomatic”?

      Yes, I do take it as a given that Sharia law is incompatible with western values, but my posts offer plenty of nuance. On top of that, I’m not writing a grad school dissertation. I don’t have to present all sides of every issue — precisely because guys like you are open to challenge me any day of the week. In fact, I encourage it. I’m glad for someone to challenge my world view and will treat them with dignity and respect as long as they don’t act like a troll.

      “Are their communities/groups of Christians who organise themselves and actively harass people? Sure. Do you think such groups are different from the “Shariah Police” group in your article? – obviously, you do, but rather than say why you just assert such groups don’t exist. Good writing anticipates counter-arguments and counter positions and it connects ideas logically and thematically. That piece didn’t.”

      If Germany had a problem with “Jesus Police,” then the Jesus Police would have been the ones with the court hearing. That didn’t happen. Instead, it was a group of Muslims.

      No offense, but you’re wrong. I explicitly say why Christians are not prone to don orange vests with “Jesus Police” and berate people in public. I said in part: “They would much rather ‘turn the other cheek.’ … They would much rather ‘render unto Caesar’ the things which are Caesar’s. They celebrate life — because Christ defeated death. Fire and brimstone speeches given by certain preachers speak of God’s coming judgment — not some human responsibility to carry it out for Him.”

      Jesus was not a warrior. Jesus did not own slaves. His message to the world is very, very different than the message you get from Islamic “Shariah Police.” You may not like my assertion that “there are no serious Christian terrorist groups,” but that is the case. If there is one “Christian terrorist group” with the global name recognition of ISIS, al Qaeda, Hamas, or Hezbollah, then I welcome you to share it with my readers.

  3. //It seems rather odd to add so much weight to my political opinions when I was nominated for my “Fan” work on science-fiction writing, movies, etc. Regardless, what’s more likely: That the guy who has a section of his blog dedicated to the “Conservative Crisis” would sink my nomination because of his own political bias, or that I “take everything as axiomatic”? //

    Well, my reasoning and opinion are laid out for anybody to read. You present your writing here as a piece – just as I do on my blog, mixing politics and criticism. Nothing wrong with that in principle, it’s what I like to do and it is (apparently) what you like to do. If somebody was judging my writing based on my blog, I’d expect them to look at it together and if they thought my political piece were poor then so be it.

    If you look back on my other choices this year and last year then you will see that I think the quality of a nominee (as I perceive it) needs to be very good to beat No Award. Overall, I don’t think your writing rose above that standard but I felt (and yes, it is my opinion because what else could it be?) that it deserved to be on my ballot (i.e. with a ranking rather than just absent).

    //No offense, but you’re wrong. I explicitly say why Christians are not prone to don orange vests with “Jesus Police” and berate people in public//

    I don’t know of a Christian group that dons orange vests but there is hardly a shortage of Christian groups that berate people in public. It is hardly uncommon outside many clinics that offer abortions for example. Now, you may regard that as being intrinsically different but to simply assert something doesn’t occur when it clearly does is the kind of lack that I’m referring to. Does that mean Christians are somehow the same as Muslims? No. Does it mean that Christians are currently engaging in the same kind of religious violence as we see from ISIS et al? No. But then you didn’t lead with ISIS et al you led with a bunch of jerks dressing up and hassling people because said jerks think their tenents should be social norms – and that most certainly isn’t confined to Islam, it isn’t even confined to religious groups.

    1. “Does that mean Christians are somehow the same as Muslims? No. Does it mean that Christians are currently engaging in the same kind of religious violence as we see from ISIS et al? No. But then you didn’t lead with ISIS et al you led with a bunch of jerks dressing up and hassling people because said jerks think their tenents should be social norms…”

      It was more than “a bunch of jerks.” As the BBC noted:

      “The group of Salafists – ultra-conservative Islamists – included Sven Lau, a preacher whose passport was seized this year after he visited Syria and a photo surfaced, showing him posing on a tank, with a Kalashnikov rifle slung around his neck.”

      “To simply assert something doesn’t occur when it clearly does is the kind of lack that I’m referring to.”

      When did I ever say Christian jerks don’t exist? The only definitive thing I said was this: “There are no serious Christian terrorist networks around the globe, and there are certainly not communities where groups of men go out dressed as the ‘Jesus police’ to harass people.”

      Those are two true statements. If you think random Christians who gather outside abortion clinics can be likened to “Shariah Police” preachers whose passports are stripped for terrorism ties, then I wish you the best with that argument.

      Europe has unofficial “No Go Zones” in highly populated Muslim areas. “Christian No-Go Zones” where the cops fear to tread do not exist. There is a reason for that, which is what my post explained. That’s fine if the post wasn’t your cup of tea, but I think you were right to fear that your political bias has skewed your opinion.

    2. //I think you were right to fear that your political bias has skewed your opinion.//

      Fair enough. As I said, it is possibility which is why I spent some time considering it as an issue and even considered rating you higher as a sort of ‘affirmative action’ compensation for the inherent bias. There comes a point though, where I’d be just trying to outwit myself. In the end it is a judgement call.

      In addition I thought it better to discuss the issue of possible bias. I could have given the same ranking and not mentioned the politics but I think that would have been misleading.

    3. “Fair enough. As I said, it is possibility which is why I spent some time considering it as an issue and even considered rating you higher as a sort of ‘affirmative action’ compensation for the inherent bias.”

      I actually do give you credit for mentioning possible bias. I’m sure a lot of people would not do that. I appreciate that.

      At the end of the day, I don’t write for awards — so I’ll never get legitimately bent out of shape over stuff like this. I’m very grateful to be nominated for a Hugo Award, but the real reason I write is because…I’m a writer.

  4. Mr Ernst, congratulations on your Hugo nomination. It’s exciting and a real honor. If I may, I’d like to offer a few points for you to consider in light of the claims made above

    There are actually plenty of examples of Christians haranguing people in public whom they deem to be immoral. Just go to Bourbon Street in New Orleans on a Friday or Saturday night. Christians in vests stand with a giant cross that has Repent and Damnation messages blasting on LED-light crawls. Sometimes they even hand out “citations” — pretend tickets that have salvation messages on them. Pretty sure the protestors and their signs at any Pride parade this weekend also put your claim of no haranguing to rest. It’s not really accurate to claim it doesn’t happen.

    On the supposed non-existence of organized Christian hate groups in the US, please take a few moments to read through the report of the Southern Poverty Law Center which helpfully maps out the organized terror groups operating in the US. They have mounds of documentation of organized Christian hate groups and not many from other religions. https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate/intelligence-report/2016/active-hate-groups-united-states-2015

    The Westboro Baptist Church folks are banned from entering both Canada and the UK (ie: akin to passport-flagging and movement-limiting).

    Snopes, Bloomberg, the Guardian, ThinkProgress, the Washington Post and many others have extensively debunked the Muslim no-go zone claims, but I won’t link here to avoid being sent to moderation. Even Fox News has backed away from the assertion and officially apologized for making it when it became too egregious to continue.

    Finally, there is a very active wing of the evangelical Christians in the US which is directly responsible for spreading anti-LGBTQ hatred and violence in Africa, including helping to write last year’s “Kill the Gays” bill in Uganda among many similar initiatives in many countries. Their advocacy, funding and preaching has led to horrific violence overseas. These organizations are considered terroristic and international in scope. http://www.thenation.com/article/its-not-just-uganda-behind-christian-rights-onslaught-africa/

    None of this is to suggest that Christianity itself is the problem, rather just to point out that any large belief community — religious or political or ethical or literary — inevitably generates radical offshoots. It’s not super helpful to paint with a broad brush, especially at a painful time when emotions are running high. I enjoy reading your writing and encountering opinions that are different from my own, but I do agree with Mr Felapton above that making huge generalizations tends to weaken one’s argument.

    1. “On the supposed non-existence of organized Christian hate groups in the US, please take a few moments to read through the report of the Southern Poverty Law Center which helpfully maps out the organized terror groups operating in the US.”

      You’re making up something I never said and then reacting to it as if I did. The Westboro Baptist Church is a family of a few dozen people who go around with dumb signs that say “God Hates Fags.” There are literally tens-of-millions of Muslims around the globe that practice Shariah law. Again, there may be Christian jerks who are so blinded by pride that they don’t see it, but the Westboro Baptist Church members haven’t had passports taken away because officials think they are a terror threat.

      “Christians in vests stand with a giant cross that has Repent and Damnation messages blasting on LED-light crawls.”

      Sure. And “Shariah Police” in Syria hold public executions where they crucify Christians, women, and gay people. See the difference? The preacher in Germany I talked about was in Syria with those very same ISIS terrorists.

      “Snopes, Bloomberg, the Guardian, ThinkProgress, the Washington Post and many others have extensively debunked the Muslim no-go zone claims, but I won’t link here to avoid being sent to moderation.”

      Why would linking to The Guardian or the Washington Post land your post in moderation? That doesn’t make any sense. I would approve it immediately.

      Yes, officially, “No Go Zones” do not exist — but the cops and the people in those neighborhoods know very well that they do. Tell the Australian 60 Minutes crew that was recently attacked in Sweden if massive immigration from the Middle East and North Africa will not create defacto no-go zones. I’m confident the crew will provide details that the Washington Post neglects to mention in its reporting.

      “I enjoy reading your writing and encountering opinions that are different from my own, but I do agree with Mr Felapton above that making huge generalizations tends to weaken one’s argument.”

      I make generalizations about Shariah Law because they are not just “generally” true — they are true. Shariah Law is incompatible with western values, and anyone who tells you otherwise is lying or ignorant.

      “I enjoy reading your writing and encountering opinions that are different from my own, but I do agree with Mr Felapton above that making huge generalizations tends to weaken one’s argument.”

      Thanks! I appreciate that you took the time out of your busy day to read my blog.

  5. lol at internet mobs…. anti gay service and rights political rhetoric does bare some responsibility here, just as assault rifles do. Most christians I know do not have anti gay service rhetoric. They are good people, they treat everyone as God birthed. The rest well, they are what they are. And yes the NRA and lobbyists, they also bear responsibility for protecting assault weapons. In other words, whatever perpetuates a lack of dignity for all people bears responsibility in the public forum.

    1. “lol at internet mobs…. anti gay service and rights political rhetoric does bare some responsibility here, just as assault rifles do.”

      Thanks for taking the time to comment tmezpoetry. What is the definition of “assault rifle”?

      “Most christians I know do not have anti gay service rhetoric. They are good people, they treat everyone as God birthed. The rest well, they are what they are.”

      Christians who are familiar with Saint Augustine and Francis De Sales do not go around hurling insults at gay people. Correct.

      “And yes the NRA and lobbyists, they also bear responsibility for protecting assault weapons. In other words, whatever perpetuates a lack of dignity for all people bears responsibility in the public forum.”

      The NRA lobbies on behalf of Second Amendment advocates just as Michael Bloomberg advocates on behalf of gun-control activists. Both sides sink millions of dollars into their efforts to influence Congress and voters. If the NRA is clearly wrong, then Mr. Bloomberg and his allies should work for a Constitutional Amendment and settle the issue once and for all.

  6. Well, I don’t place much value on Hugo’s, they’re too much like this bizarre popularity/beauty contest involving a bunch of middle school mean girls who have been huffing hairspray. I think you’re just awesome. 🙂

    As to this tragedy, I really appreciate all the sane voices that are not sending out upside down tweets or trying to blame the mentally ill. A guy today told me, “some people are just evil and some people just follow an evil ideology.” It was such a relief, because yes, sometime immorality is just that simple. Every time I hear that mental illness caused this I think, really? Because I know a lot of mentally ill people and they wouldn’t hurt a fly. Than there’s poverty, a bad childhood, divorce, guns, Christianity, etc, etc, and I just want to scream at all the excuses, at all of us they have just tossed under the bus, all of us who have lived those things and would never try to hurt anyone.

    Name it for what it is,it’s pure evil and it;s being done in the name of Islam.

    1. “Well, I don’t place much value on Hugo’s, they’re too much like this bizarre popularity/beauty contest involving a bunch of middle school mean girls who have been huffing hairspray. I think you’re just awesome.:)”

      Thanks! This was the second Hugo review where someone said they liked my science fiction commentary, but then essentially said my political posts complicated matters. It’s bizarre to me to have a contest where the work that got me nominated is something like my X-Men: Days of Future Past review, but then some voter is going to give me “No Award” status because he gives a large amount of weight to my opinions on Shariah law.

    2. I agree, it seems that the person is just going out of their way to try to discredit the author. Why compare articles from a different category to judge another? Straw man anyone?

  7. The usual suspects (Obama, Clinton, Sanders, Sally Kohn, the MSM) spout the usual BS, using the NRA and right-wing “hate speech” as the scapegoat. (“Hate speech” includes referring to Caitlyn Jenner as “he.” Or saying that biological males should use the men’s restroom. “Hate speech” does NOT include the imam’s speech in Orlando in March, specifically saying that gay people should be killed.) And, of course, they insist that Islam had absolutely nothing to do with it.

    Meanwhile, ISIS claims responsibility for the massacre. And a former co-worker of Omar Mateen’s says that he was behaving suspiciously, and had made homophobic statements, but his employers would not do anything about it because they did not want to be accused of Islamophobia.

    From San Bernardino to Orlando, political correctness kills innocent people.

    I’ve heard some remarks that this incident should be a wake-up call for the LGBT community. But gay Americans have made a Faustian bargain with the Democrats, and it is probably too late to get out of it. “The government will leave you alone in your bedroom, but will control your every thought, word, and deed outside of the bedroom.” (The Libertarians will leave you alone in and out of your bedroom, but they can’t win a major election, because they are not promising to give away lots of Free Stuff.)

    I’m tempted to say, “Thank God I’m an agnostic,” but that would be unfair to Christianity. Not all religions have the same tenets.

    Christianity went through its violent period hundreds of years ago, but eventually outgrew the concept of holy war. Maybe Islam will, someday, but it hasn’t yet.

    And pacifist Christians could point to statements by the religion’s founder, condemning violence, preaching forgiveness and mercy, and warning against taking the law into one’s own hands. The Bible may condemn certain behavior, including homosexuality, but it also states that “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, sayeth the Lord.” That is, only God has the right to punish sinners.

    Conversely, terrorist Muslims can point to passages in the Koran, exhorting followers to wage jihad and “kill the infidels wherever you find them.”

    There are individuals, calling themselves Christians, who are murdering gay people or blowing up abortion clinics. There are individual Muslims who do not believe in terrorism. And both groups are out of touch with the tenets of their respective religions.

    1. “From San Bernardino to Orlando, political correctness kills innocent people.”

      I think that about sums it up. When you can’t talk about a problem, then you can’t accurately define it. When you can’t define a problem, then it metastasizes. Frustration builds. People get angry and eventually it all boils over. I think the popularity of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders accurately reflects the symptoms of a much deeper problem. We’ve got a powder keg on our hands and if we don’t figure out what to do about it soon then it’s going to explode.

  8. This shooting…man.

    I think back to when I was a liberal, when I was a person that ‘cared about equality’ and raged against the inherent unfairness of America to people of color, people who were different…and I remember always just being angry. Even though I wouldn’t admit I was angry…I was always projecting things into people I didn’t like..and I didn’t like a whole bunch of people I had never met and never understood. Honestly, it was just hate…and I had a lot of it.

    I guess that’s why I reacted to Nick Spencer’s Captain America stuff so strongly…he’s obviously intelligent…and full of hate, like I used to be. When your that hateful, the target of your hate becomes responsible for anything, beyond all reason…and the people you have been told to defend, become innocent of any crime, no matter how terrible. We’ve seen them…the ‘9/11 is our fault’ people.

    When I dated a black girl in high school, there was nothing more important than the fact that I was Filipino and white. That I was unworthy, that I wasn’t good enough, that I needed to be ‘with my own kind’. When I joined the Marines, moved to the south and fell in love with a conservative white girl, her family opened their homes and their hearts to me…and my world of hate was destroyed, and I had to reassess what is right and what is wrong.

    I can recognize the feelings pretty well in these tweets. They know, deep down, that after something like this, Christians will pray for them, rather than lash out. They are ashamed that they look the other way at the people that really hate them, and persecute those that inconvenience them at best. They are angry, because the Evangelicals at the local bible-thumpers building don’t come over to kill them and give them the victimhood and justification they desperately crave, but the people they have so passionately defended are gunning them down. Rather than lash out at their tormentor, they focus on an old enemy.

    They see Christians, republicans, conservatives…as a group of single minded hate…as Spencer put it, people who act good and seem to be decent, but are all…collectively evil…because of their thoughts, their votes and who they are. Sometimes, when you think the traditional family ‘over there’ is full of dark secrets, beatings and racism it’s actually a mirror.

    I just see people, and the poor victims at the club were ordinary people, out to have a good time, talk to their friends and unwind. None of them deserved to die. The idea that they are ‘evil because they are gay’ is completely alien to me…but you can see how this works the other way. It’s sad and horrible to say this, but undeniable…many of these liberals are closer to the terrorist murderer than they care to admit…and that’s a very depressing thought.

    I have more on your Hugo stuff, but I think I should make that a separate reply. (or maybe it’s time I get to writing for real…is this my calling?…I’m supposed to be a metrologist! lol, help Doug!)

    1. “When I dated a black girl in high school, there was nothing more important than the fact that I was Filipino and white. That I was unworthy, that I wasn’t good enough, that I needed to be ‘with my own kind’. When I joined the Marines, moved to the south and fell in love with a conservative white girl, her family opened their homes and their hearts to me…and my world of hate was destroyed, and I had to reassess what is right and what is wrong.”

      I dated a Hispanic girl when I was in the Army (“undocumented” as well). She came to Germany and met my roommate at the time, who was also a Hispanic. He spoke to her in Spanish and I thought nothing of it. Years later she told me that he lectured her on dating a white guy, betraying “her people” or whatever, etc. … Fast forward in time and I’m married to a woman who immigrated from China. I go to a party and one of the family friends literally refuses to shake my hand when I hold it out to greet her. To me it doesn’t say much about Hispanics or Asians other than no one group has a monopoly on idiots.

      As you point out, it’s pointless to let hate fester inside. Everyone is a child of God — a soul with a purpose. Each individual has my trust until he/she gives me a reason to believe otherwise.

      “I have more on your Hugo stuff, but I think I should make that a separate reply. (or maybe it’s time I get to writing for real…is this my calling?…I’m supposed to be a metrologist! lol, help Doug!)”

      I’d like to hear your thoughts on the Hugo hubbub. 🙂 Also, you may be a metrologist, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be an awesome writer on the side. Haha.

      Side note: Speaking of writing, I’m a bit behind this week. My wife bought me Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. That series is my one weakness! I barely play video games, but I am a sucker for Metal Gear.

    2. I almost wish someone would make an “Atari” version of Metal Gear. That would be amazing.

      The first Metal Gear came out for Nintendo in 1987. They’ve come a long way. I have always loved Snake.

    3. Please write more, I know I would like to read it.

      Douglas, I know I have not written much lately “I have been very busy”, but I wanted to let you know that I always make time to read your work. Sadly I have not listened to the latest podcast that you were on. I hope to listen to podcast #7 when I can.
      Congratulations on the nomination, you deserve it.

      You know you are doing something good when people stretch to such lengths to bring you down. Could it be that someone may just be jealous or trying to get attention, who knows.

    4. “Douglas, I know I have not written much lately ‘I have been very busy,’ but I wanted to let you know that I always make time to read your work. Sadly I have not listened to the latest podcast that you were on. I hope to listen to podcast #7 when I can.
      Congratulations on the nomination, you deserve it.”

      Truth! Great to hear from you, man. I’m glad to hear that all is well on your end. Thanks for the compliments.

    5. Thank you, things have been way too busy. Nothing like having two great kids, working two jobs, creating new curriculum for another college and going back to school full time to keep you busy!

  9. Metal Gear’s the greatest. Me and my best friend started our friendship over the very first game on nintendo. Still haven’t played 5, but it’s on the pick up list! The series has an interesting labyrinthine metastory…that I love despite how absolutely bonkers it is.

    Yeah, I just learned to take step back and stop thinking of people in groups, and really it’s years later that I find out it’s a ‘thing’ as in identity politics…but it was quite sly…Being taught not to judge others because they are different…when that’s exactly what they are teaching you to do, usually by accusing other groups of being discriminatory in general toward you.

    1. “The series has an interesting labyrinthine metastory…that I love despite how absolutely bonkers it is.”

      Haha. That’s a kind way to put it. My wife basically asked me to sum up the story while we were eating dinner and I just started laughing.

  10. I recall being a little miffed yesterday at how slow it took some of the UK news services to pick up on the Orlando coverage because of the Queen’s 90th birthday, I even took to FB and called her an “old div” because my heart was invested more in the plight of those poor victims and real growing concern. I came off as quite an ageist little cretin really…which is’nt like me at all..ultimately the coverage eventually started and then that was all that was on the news for ages, to such an extent that I sort of felt guilty that a rather generous and good natured gathering like the Patron’s Lunch, where people braved lousy weather to mark an advancing woman’s reign on the throne with fun and optimism, was now being put to the side in favor of another sordid saga in a world full of murder and mayhem.

    What you want in life is some assurance, when you get it, sometimes you balk at it because there’s that nagging part of you that always doubts assurance being able to last.

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