Chalk

I went to U.S. Army Basic Training at Fort Benning, Georgia, in 1997. Emory University is roughly 125 north of that, which is incredibly interesting when one considers the following:

  • At one location an objective observer will find scores of young infantrymen who are generally unfazed by any insult, no matter how crass or mean.
  • The second location, however, is home to students who actually claim to be in “pain” over pro-Trump chalk scribbles.

The Emory Wheel originally reported the story on Tuesday but it has been picked up by countless media outlets since then.

The Associated Press wrote Wednesday:

A flurry of chalk scrawls supporting Donald Trump on the Emory University campus sparked a demonstration by students who demanded and were granted a meeting with the president, saying the messages made them feel concerned and frightened. At least one of them said he got death threats after the protest.

The students viewed the messages as intimidation, and they voiced “genuine concern and pain” as a result, Emory President Jim Wagner wrote Tuesday, one day after meeting with 40 to 50 student demonstrators.

The Atlanta university on Wednesday provided The Associated Press with a copy of Wagner’s letter, in which he said students confronted by Trump’s name in chalk “heard a message about values regarding diversity and respect that clash with Emory’s own.”

Students at Monday’s protest chanted, “You are not listening! Come speak to us, we are in pain!” shortly before Wagner agreed to meet with them…”

Pain would be standing near an Islamic terrorist as he blows himself up in a crowded international airport in Brussels. Pain would be what a soldier feels when he wakes up in a hospital bed after an I.E.D. blast in Iraq or Afghanistan. Pain would be a whole lot of things, but it would not be a pampered Emory University student — whose mom and dad are shelling out $45,000 a year for a degree in Gender Studies — reading Donald Trump’s name in chalk.

Brussels Attack

Think it can’t get worse? Think again.

“I’m supposed to feel comfortable and safe [here],” a student told school officials, the Emory Wheel reported. “But this man is being supported by students on our campus and our administration shows that they, by their silence, support it as well. … I don’t deserve to feel afraid at my school.”

Donald Trump says he is going to deport all 12 million illegal immigrants, but he may want to find a way to deport 12 million natural-born citizens who are “afraid” of chalk art instead.

The students attending these institutions of “higher learning” should be ashamed of themselves. They are soft. They are weak. They are fragile infants trapped in adults’ bodies — and they will ultimately be the ones who must face down the countless threats facing the nation in the years to come. What makes the whole situation even worse is that those entrusted with preparing their minds for the challenges of tomorrow have instead opted to entertain inane and babyish behavior.

The Emory Wheel continued:

The University will review footage “up by the hospital [from] security cameras” to identify those who made the chalkings, [University President James] Wagner told the protesters. He also added that if they’re students, they will go through the conduct violation process, while if they are from outside of the University, trespassing charges will be pressed.

Pathetic.

I attended the University of Southern California when I exited the military many years ago and was stunned at the ideological inculcation practiced by most professors. I worried about the effects it would have on future generations and spent countless hours offering students an alternative (e.g., my time as the Program Coordinator for The Heritage Foundation’s Young Leaders Program). I still continue those efforts through this blog and other endeavors, but it appears as though the rip tide of political correctness has taken the nation out to sea.

Knowledgable swimmers can easily escape rip tides, but at this point it appears as though millions of Americans have made the conscious decision to drown.

Emory

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

4 comments

  1. “…he may want to find a way to deport 12 million natural-born citizens who are “afraid” of chalk art”

    Hmm, well now, that’s the most encouraging Trump message I’ve heard yet.

    1. I can work with the guy who just walked 50 miles through the desert to achieve a goal. It’s much more difficult to work with someone who is “afraid” of chalk scribbles. 🙂

  2. If students wrote pro-Clinton or pro-Sanders graffiti, would they be punished for a “conduct violation”?

    This kind of nonsense will continue as long as it gets the desired results. Instead of indulging these spoiled brats, the dean should tell them, “Your ancestors faced German machine guns and Japanese bayonets. Now you are whining about some chalk markings. You complain because you ‘heard a message about values regarding diversity that clash with (your) own.’ On the one hand, you advocate ‘diversity,’ but at the same time, you claim a right not to be exposed to different opinions. A university is not a hiding place, and it is not a playground where overgrown children can postpone growing up for four years or more. It is a school where competent young adults receive higher education to qualify them for responsible jobs in the real world. If you can’t handle that, you are not ready for college. Either grow up or drop out.”

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