Ditko SpiderMan 33

Marvel’s upcoming Dr. Strange movie will undoubtedly attract mountains of media attention — and cash — for the company. What is not likely to get much traction, however, is the story of co-creator Steve Ditko.

Ditko (who also co-created Spider-Man), abruptly walked away from Marvel years ago like NFL-great Barry Sanders did with football. BBC did a documentary on the man titled “In Search of Steve Ditko” in 2007, which was fascinating for all the wrong reasons: The pompous attitudes displayed by men ruminating on why Ditko would leave answered the question, but their lack of self-awareness prevented them from seeing it.

Dr Strange Steve Ditko

Ditko’s love for Ayn Rand, his objectivist politics, and his character “Mr. A,” were explored midway through the documentary. His philosophy in a nutshell was explained in an issue from 1972:

“Only through black and white principles can a man distinguish between good and evil. The principles guide man’s basic choice of actions. Man can attempt to choose contradictions, grey principles, like man can choose to be dishonest, corrupt, but that choice only leads to evil — to self-destruction.” Mr. A, by Steve Ditko.

There are serious philosophical arguments that have been made over the course of thousands of years to back up Ditko’s claim. But yet, to liberal writers like Neil Gaiman and Alan Moore, Ditko is just a madman.

Gaiman told BBC host Jonathan Ross:

“You know, Steve Ditko obviously would like you to read these and see the light and step into the light and become an objectivist and become an Ayn Randian philosopher like what he is. And instead I wind up reading them as something closer to classic American outsider art. They move more into the realm of just sheer beautiful, wonderful straight-from-the-heart, American barking-madness.” — Neil Gaiman

When Neil Gaiman writes stories, they’re all apparently barking-sanity — according to Neil Gaiman.

Let’s take his 2001 short story, Foreign Parts, for example:

“Simon masturbated a great deal. Every night — sometimes more than that if unable to sleep. He could take as long, or as short, a time to climax as he wished. And in his mind he had had them all. Film and television stars; women from the office; school girls; the naked models who pouted from the crumpled pages of Fiesta; faceless slaves in chains; tanned boys with bodies like Greek gods…” — Gaiman, Neil. Smoke and Mirrors, 2001. Page 239.

When Gaiman writes of men who masturbate to school girls, slaves and tanned boys, it’s sanity. When Ditko writes about the duality of good and evil, it’s “barking madness.”

Telling, isn’t it?

Mr A Steve Ditko

Next there is Alan Moore, himself a bit of a recluse, who decided to take part in the pile-on.

“The most unpleasant right-wing character is Rorschach. He almost ends up certainly the character with the most ferocious integrity. Even if his politics are completely mad, he has this ferocious moral integrity that has made him one of the most popular characters in the book. Obviously, that ferocious moral draw of an integrity, that was kind of my take upon Steve Ditko.”

Mr A Ditko

Steve Ditko’s politics are allegedly madness, but yet in 2014 it was Alan Moore who said the following to Pádraig Ó Méalóid at Slovobooks:

“It looks to me very much like a significant section of the public, having given up on attempting to understand the reality they are actually living in, have instead reasoned that they might at least be able to comprehend the sprawling, meaningless, but at-least-still-finite ‘universes’ presented by DC or Marvel Comics. I would also observe that it is, potentially, culturally catastrophic to have the ephemera of a previous century squatting possessively on the cultural stage and refusing to allow this surely unprecedented era to develop a culture of its own, relevant and sufficient to its times.”

It was Ditko who said in the 1970’s that living in a culturally grey area was a recipe for destruction. He was laughed and ridiculed by Alan Moore in 2007, and then by 2014 Moore was admitting that grey-loving western society can no longer make sense of the world. He said western civilization was on the verge of a “culturally catastrophic” moment. Do you laugh or cry at the irony?

Perhaps the cherry on top came when Gaiman called Ditko, “Magnificently uptight, world-class uptight, impossibly-uptight” for his political clashes with Stan Lee.

Fans of Spider-Man know that Lee weirdly allowed himself to be referred to as the sole creator for years until Ditko finally spoke up. (How “uptight” of him.) Lee even tries to make the case that he really is the sole creator in the BBC documentary. His reasoning: He had “the idea.”

Note to Stan Lee: An idea without action is wasted potential.

Steve Ditko put an idea into action, and therefore he is rightfully the co-creator of Spider-Man. A man who has a crystal-clear understanding of right and wrong would not need to be prompted to call Ditko Spider-Man’s co-creator.

This blog covered the industry’s treatment of Frank Miller, Chuck Dixon and Paul Rivoche in 2014. At the time I questioned why there were no Captain America tales where Steve Rogers performs black ops in Middle East against Islamic terrorists. I said Iron Man was a character who begged for a Rand-inspired tale called A World Without Tony Stark, and the response by a liberal commenter was “readers don’t want to read Rand.”

Classic! Whether it is the activist-writers within the industry or their readers, they are unable to objectively step outside their own psychological “safe space” and make the differentiation between I don’t want to read ‘A World Without Tony Stark” and “Potential customers would not buy ‘A World Without Tony Stark.”

The comic book industry is dying because men like Neil Gaiman and Alan Moore sneer at those who politically disagree with them. They scoff at those who don’t subscribe to moral relativism, and then lament the morally-relativistic world they helped create.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to read that issue of The Superior Spider-Man where Dan Slott had Doctor Octopus masturbate to thoughts of Mary Jane. Then I’ll wonder if Slott was inspired by Neil Gaiman’s Foreign Parts, or if modern comic book creators just have a strange fascination with masturbation.

There are plenty of comic book readers out there who do not think Mr. Ditko is “barking-mad.” We just don’t have megaphones offered to us by BBC, Marvel, or writers like Messrs. Gaiman and Moore. This blog will continue doing its small part to defend the values of men like Steve Ditko until that changes.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Hat tip to reader Nate Winchester for sending me the BBC documentary.

Advertisements

About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

31 comments

  1. Moore’s comment I’m trying to wrap my head around still–is he chastising creators of modern comics for not imbuing them enough with their own modern sensibility? Chastising the readership for not demanding better of the creators themselves?

    Sounds like a cool documentary, though–I will have to watch that, and thanks for the link. It’s also endlessly fascinating to me that Spider-Man’s co-creator is so mercurial and (what many consider to be) eccentric.

    1. One would think Moore would get some of these questions on Ditko and say to himself, “You know, what? A lot of people think I’m a weird dude, too. I think I’m just going to hold off on casting him as a madman.”

      In terms of his comments on culture, one of the follow up questions that came to my mind is, “What do Millennials stand for? What are people going to say about them 20 years from now?

      Right now they just come across as Generation Safe Space. That’s pretty embarrassing.

      “Sounds like a cool documentary, though–I will have to watch that, and thanks for the link.”

      Overall, I think it’s an incredibly informational documentary for anyone who loves Spider-Man. The part with Stan Lee got awkward fast. I can’t believe he really thinks he should be considered the sole creator of Spider-Man. He makes it seem like he’s making this noble gesture to a guy who technically doesn’t deserve the co-creator designation. I lost some respect for Stan Lee as I was watching it.

    2. Well, duh. Speaking for myself only, I never had any respect for Stan Lee once I passed the age of 13.

  2. With Lee and Ditko, I think it goes beyond mere political clashes (though that’s still a pretty big part of it). Ditko had his own differing ideas for the book (including the Green Goblin mystery) and Lee was getting a lot of the credit at the time. (Think like a smaller-scale version of the rift with Kirby.) Not to minimize what Lee brought to the table, but I’d imagine not getting proper credit is far more frustrating than political disagreements (but that’s just me). Ditko might feel differently since he never really publicly went after Lee outside of the complaints you mentioned.

    That said, for Gaiman and especially Moore to question anything about anyone is absolutely laughable to me. There are certainly things I can praise and commend them for, but as nicely demonstrated, they shouldn’t be throwing stones in their glass houses.

    1. “Not to minimize what Lee brought to the table, but I’d imagine not getting proper credit is far more frustrating than political disagreements (but that’s just me).”

      Tough call, although the two of those things together had to be a toxic brew. I’ve always been the type where I care much more for autonomy at work than getting credit for certain things. As long as people leave me alone, I’m happy. 🙂

      “That said, for Gaiman and especially Moore to question anything about anyone is absolutely laughable to me. There are certainly things I can praise and commend them for, but as nicely demonstrated, they shouldn’t be throwing stones in their glass houses.”

      Exactly. My wife and I obviously have Gaiman’s “Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions” on our bookshelf. I admit that he’s a writer worth checking out. But just because I disagree with him politically, I’m not going to go around calling him “barking mad.”

      It’s irritating to me that I can respect a liberal creator’s wishes to write on masturbation or whatever and leave him be, but for whatever reason he feels the need to call Ditko “barking mad” for creating Mr. A.

  3. I really like this blog. I’ve been reading for a while now. This is my first time commenting Doug. I don’t hear a lot of conservative points of view in regards to entertainment media and comics. I’m glad I found this blog. I’ll try to comment more often. Keep up the good work Doug.

    In regards to the this article, “ferocious integrity” is this supposed to be a problem? That’s like saying someone is ferociously healthy. Oy.

    1. “I’ve been reading for a while now. This is my first time commenting Doug. I don’t hear a lot of conservative points of view in regards to entertainment media and comics. I’m glad I found this blog.”

      We make a good team, Richard — I’m glad you’ve taken the time to read and comment! I’m always happy when another reader decides to contribute to the discussion.

      “In regards to the this article, ‘ferocious integrity’ is this supposed to be a problem? That’s like saying someone is ferociously healthy. Oy.”

      Haha! Exactly. Regardless, I look forward to hearing some “ferocious honesty” from you in response to future blog posts. 😉

  4. Despite collecting and reading since the 1970’s I have pretty much given up in despair at the current crop of comic books published. I was a Marvel kid, but their overbearing political correctness has left me disappointed in every book I read. Perhaps a little more of Mr. A is just what I need.

    By the way Doug, long time lurker/first time poster. Like you I am Catholic and love comics. Enjoy your blog immensely, my only complaint is I would love to see more posts! Thanks!

    1. “By the way Doug, long time lurker/first time poster. Like you I am Catholic and love comics. Enjoy your blog immensely, my only complaint is I would love to see more posts! Thanks!”

      Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Martinho! My average is around 15 posts per month, although ideally I’d like to get that up to around 20. Once the summer movie season kicks into high gear there is a good chance that I’ll get close.

      I haven’t mentioned it for awhile, but I’ve been slowly writing a book for the last 2 years as time allows. Let’s just say that it is aimed at Catholic guys who like comics… I’m almost finished with the actual writing, although I may be looking to hire an artist sometime soon. I’m not sure how that process works, so hopefully that doesn’t side-track my timeline too long. 🙂

      Anyway, when the book eventually comes out I’ll probably give away one to a regular reader. My guess is that you’ll be on the short list.

    2. A book on Catholics guys who love comics? Count me in!I would love to be on that list!
      I hope this is not too forward and I am not sure what you are looking for, but I am a professional artist. I did some comic work when I was younger but now work very traditionally painting portraits and figures in oil. You can see some of my work here: http://www.martinhoart.com/galleries/paintings.htm
      and https://issuu.com/champion13/docs/sacredbeauty/200?e=7631541/13670717

    3. “I hope this is not too forward and I am not sure what you are looking for, but I am a professional artist. I did some comic work when I was younger but now work very traditionally painting portraits and figures in oil.”

      I’m not joking around when I say this, Martinho, but this is exactly what I need. If you don’t mind, then I will write you an email within the next couple of days at the account you provided WordPress.

  5. This was interesting to read and to watch. The cultural shift towards moral ambiguity is something I observe quite a bit. Those of us who plea for some morality, even some philosophy, tradition, are often called insane, uptight. The truth however, is that you simply cannot have a proper story without good guys and bad guys and dragons to slay. That is true in literature and in comic books, but that is true of our own cultural narrative too.

    1. “The truth however, is that you simply cannot have a proper story without good guys and bad guys and dragons to slay.”

      I did find it quite strange to see men whose stock-in-trade is comic books talking as if “good vs. evil” was detrimental to the art form. Everything seems to have turn topsy-turvy. So I’m supposed to enjoy a whole slew of guys fighting when I don’t even know who is good and who is bad? Ummmm, thanks but no thanks. It takes some serious skill to pull that kind of thing off, which is why it usually fails (e.g., Marvel’s first go-round at ‘Civil War.’)

  6. While I am by no means a Right Winger in the political or social games, not by a long shot, it has become apparently clear to me that most media outlets have become as tyrannical and oppressive as the supposed political faction (Conservative) they champion against. If you disagree with them, you are labelled as pernicious and a bigot in the same sense hard right wingers would label the left as “loony” or subversive. As somebody who was raised in a Conservative household but tended to lean more liberal (putting me as apolitical at worst and left-of-centre at best) growing up and become aware of the world around me, it is very difficult to tolerate a******s on both sides. When I am at family gatherings, they act like stereotypical right wingers that the media labels Conservatives out to be and I suddenly find it as tolerable as having a loud dubstep track with the bass cranked to 11 two inches from my ears, and yet when I go to a comic book convention of any kind I hear all this drama that begins there and leaks all over social media that if you try to be rational and realistic, calm or otherwise, you get blasted with this “YOU’RE A HORRIBLE PERSON! FUUUUUUUU!” rhetoric, which is pretty cruel. It’s like watching a person literally try to fight with himself and the person who gets screwed? Everybody else.

    This extreme left bias is uncomfortable even from my own friends who have been reading drafts of my book who keep going “you should make this person a woman because blahblahblah PC brah?” when the dude is already black and a supergenius, or when while the protagonist is a “straight white cis-gendered male” which is apparently taboo in tumblr-controlled comic media (despite PC heroes selling for a fraction of the sales said white heroes sell for might I add,) and yet his two major supporting cast members are either a Muslim-Canadian of Egyptian descent or a kick**s bisexual female. Yet apparently despite me literally letting the diverse world around me and the characters I write feel organic, nope, I’m a bigot because my protagonist is a straight white male and the story is about a hero being a hero rather than who he’s f*****g. Wait WHAT!?

    So what, I publish the book, I break into the industry, then what? It’s a steaming pile of s**t because writing a story that focuses on the heroes you care about and what makes them the heroes they are is now less important than who they’re screwing, the amount of melanin in their skin, or what religion they are but OH HEAVEN FORBID that a character can be a Christian of any kind because “that’s a political ploy and the Church is an oppressive institution where old men f**k boys and support anti-abortion laws and want gay people burned at the stake like witches while they go against their own biblical nonsense to some invisible sky king that a dozen people made people believe was real 2000 years ago and people fell for that!”

    You see where even being a more socially and politically progressive minded being can break your spirit when those who oppose you, while you may disagree with some of their points, at least make sense (despite the media making them out as damn fools, and in some cases that might be true) and yet the people on your side are willing to stab you in the back because you’re “not progressive enough! And white! And male! And straight cis-gendered! So automatically evil!” (even though anybody know knows me also knows I suffer from mental illness to the point it is damn near crippling to hold any kind of employment for any extended period of time due to said mental health issues that on the surface might not appear until you take a glance and tick off the symptoms like a Bingo card. And even WITH that they STILL think they have more issues than you.)

    1. “The people on your side are willing to stab you in the back because you’re “not progressive enough! And white! And male! And straight cis-gendered! So automatically evil!” (even though anybody know knows me also knows I suffer from mental illness to the point it is damn near crippling to hold any kind of employment for any extended period of time due to said mental health issues that on the surface might not appear until you take a glance and tick off the symptoms like a Bingo card. And even WITH that they STILL think they have more issues than you.)”

      This is very telling. I wrote a piece awhile back titled: “Captain America exists — and his name is William Kyle Carpenter.” That guy was literally blown up every which way to Sunday and by the grace of God put back together again. I cannot fathom the amount of mental and physical pain the guy carries with him on a daily basis. He doesn’t make excuses for his challenges, but yet I’m supposed to believe that the gay or minority son of a doctor has it worse because someone might occasionally give them a dirty look at the grocery store or use the word ‘gay’ as a pejorative. I don’t think so.

      To me, principled conservatives just want to be left alone. If a guy wants to go to some hippie commune out in the desert and do LSD with his buddies, then they can do that — just leave me alone. If someone wants to spend their days viewing everything through the prism of “Does this make transgender people feel welcome,” then they can do that — just leave me alone. At some point in time it became not good enough to just respect the guy next to you. Now you have to be an activist for his cause or you’re somehow a racist or a bigot or a homophobe or whatever.

      That really bothers me. I have my own life to deal with, but yet now I need to be out on the street carrying a Black Lives Matter sign or else I’m racist. Give me a break. These activists are only making guys like me care less about what they think. Trying to force me to do something or guilt me into it is not the way to go.

  7. My girlfriend is of mixed-race, and we’ve gotten into a few discussions over race lately. One was me expressing my distaste over Miles seemingly being propped up to be “the” Spider-Man in the Marvel U (this was before the book even came out). She argued that people of color need to see themselves represented, and if it means appropriating icons like Spidey, so be it. I told her it was offensive to me more on creative grounds. If they’re going to farm out a lot of the things that made a character great in the first place, it’s a lose-lose for both characters.

    I try to see the sense on both sides, but I can’t help but feel at the same time like there’s a massive cultural over-correction going on. Where are the new, strong characters that are diverse, instead of assimilating existing ones?

    1. or they could do what happened when Iron Man and the Avengers became big and just market the characters who up until that point were B-listers and MAKE them A-listers. Falcon didn’t need to become Cap to be successful. Luke Cage is still a thing as is Black Panther, they just made Kamala Khan (and to be fair the proper title of Ms. Marvel had been vacant for years so that is fair game,) or characters like the Prowler, GIVE the X-Men their time (the most diverse team in comics PERIOD,) more for Captain Marvel herself, Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Elektra, White Tiger, bring back Goliath, give more time to Valkyrie and Sif along with the new character Angela, and so on, and so on, and so on.

      Good marketing will make characters prominent and show, wait, PC characters ALREADY exist in Marvel, but they aren’t “selling” well whose fault is that!? OH WAIT! You don’t need to unnecessarily and unnaturally race bend and make legacy PC heroes JUST to make the comics more PC, just make new ones.

    2. “She argued that people of color need to see themselves represented, and if it means appropriating icons like Spidey, so be it.”

      It’s the old “ends justify the means” route for her, I see. If she favors a social-justice scorched-earth campaign for getting representation, then I think that’s interesting…but at the same time I would feel rather insulted if my representation hinged on getting A-Squad derivatives. Marvel is saying, “Here, you can have the clones that are one generation removed from the original. Everyone knows it, but…since racial bean counters only care about the number of beans they have, well, here you go. Here’s your bean.”

      It works for something like Green Lantern, where they could be countless men and women who are worthy to wear the ring. It’s just embarrassing and sad to do it with Thor, Spider-Man, etc. I would much rather have an original hero that kicks butt than some second-rate imitation of an icon. It’s also lazy on the company’s part. You could make the argument that if they really cared about having a diverse cast of characters, then they would put in the hard work necessary to built up an original kick-butt hero. To say, “Hey, let’s give these whiners Toni Stark, ‘Iron Woman,’ and check the gender-diversity box,” makes me cringe. I’m not sure how so-called feminists can get behind that sort of thing.

      I try to see the sense on both sides, but I can’t help but feel at the same time like there’s a massive cultural over-correction going on.

      You feel that way because that is exactly what is happening. 🙂

  8. I’ve always like Ditko and never liked how Lee got all the credit for Spidey and Doctor Strange. I’ve never liked how he was labelled “crazy” because he has Objectivist viewpoints, either. Alan Moore once claimed to worship an obscure Roman snake god named Glycon, so he really shouldn’t be lambasting others’ beliefs.

    Plus, I think Moore is a cranky old man who just can’t accept that the majority of his characters haven’t achieved the popularity that many Marvel and DC characters have, hence his reason for lashing out. He strikes me as being jealous of their success. Everyone, even those who aren’t comics fans, know who Spider-Man is. Not many know who Rorschach or Doctor Manhattan are outside die-hard comic fans. Then again, I’m not a Watchmen fan.

    As for Gaiman, I’m not a fan of his. I never thought he was that great of a writer. I always thought Sandman was overrated. He used to live in my home state of Minnesota and also in Wisconsin until he demanded an outrageous speaking fee for an appearance on an NPR program that caused quite a bit of controversy locally. It really soured me on him, especially when he used it as an excuse to attack conservatives for not supporting public radio. After that, he moved out to the East Coast.

    1. “Alan Moore once claimed to worship an obscure Roman snake god named Glycon, so he really shouldn’t be lambasting others’ beliefs.”

      This had me laughing out loud as my wife was trying to sleep. Thanks a lot, Carl! 😉

      “Not many know who Rorschach or Doctor Manhattan are outside die-hard comic fans. Then again, I’m not a Watchmen fan.”

      I always thought it was hilarious that Moore said Rorschach was a “right-wing nut,” but many of the character’s insights into humanity’s dark side were accurate. Moore seems genuinely puzzled by the character’s popularity, but on top of everything else…Rorschach was the one guy who got it. He was right all along, even though everyone else thought he was a conspiracy theorist. So he was right about humanity’s potential for great evil, and he was right about the plot to kill all the other heroes.

    2. “This had me laughing out loud as my wife was trying to sleep. Thanks a lot, Carl!”

      LOL… hope your wife didn’t lose sleep on account of me. 😉

      “I always thought it was hilarious that Moore said Rorschach was a “right-wing nut,” but many of the character’s insights into humanity’s dark side were accurate. Moore seems genuinely puzzled by the character’s popularity, but on top of everything else…Rorschach was the one guy who got it. He was right all along, even though everyone else thought he was a conspiracy theorist. So he was right about humanity’s potential for great evil, and he was right about the plot to kill all the other heroes.”

      That’s what always bothered me about Watchmen. He’s the only character who understood what was going on, and yet Moore wants us to think he’s a nut. In a regular story, he’d have exposed Ozymandias and would’ve had him arrested. Instead, he’s killed and the villain gets away with genocide.

  9. First and foremost I love Steve Ditko, he’s one of the greats. While Lee’s words have to be viewed through the prism of the time they were written, the ideas and art are timeless. The opening of Amazing #33 (where the panels get bigger and bigger until Spidey finally throws the machinery off) is brilliance you hardly see anymore. I have my criticisms of parts if Rand’s philosophy, but nonetheless respect the hell out of Ditko for standing for his ideals and not just falling in line.

    I loved Sandman and Watchmen, but their writers absolutely turn me off. Moore is an anti American hypocrite and I will never give another dime to one of his creations. Moore complains of how his characters get used in movies but freely uses characters that are in the public domain as he sees fit, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and that pornographic crap he and his wife(?) put out. I don’t have the same disdain for Gaimen, I just don’t care to hear from another “mad” left winger.

    1. “Moore is an anti American hypocrite and I will never give another dime to one of his creations. Moore complains of how his characters get used in movies but freely uses characters that are in the public domain as he sees fit, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and that pornographic crap he and his wife(?) put out.”

      I feel the same way about Moore, AGP. It’s ironic that he whines about how his characters get used by the companies he created them for but uses all the public domain characters he can in LXG. I can’t stand the LXG comics; they’re pretty disgusting. I liked the movie, though. And from what I know of Lost Girls (I would never read that crap), he took three public domain fantasy heroines (Dorothy from “The Wizard of Oz,” Wendy from “Peter Pan” and Alice from “Alice in Wonderland”) and retconned their classic stories into childhood sexual encounters. WTF doesn’t even begin to describe it.

      As an aside, I do use a few public domain characters (such as Mina Harker from Dracula and Frankenstein’s Monster, for instance) in the book I’m writing (and almost done with), although they’re supporting characters and not the main ones.

    2. Carl, I’m sure you don’t get on your high horse about your own creations while perverting public domain characters. I want to be clear, it’s not that I have a problem with a creator using public domain characters, I have a problem with the blatant hypocrisy of Moore.

  10. Hey, man … FT/NB …

    Really glad I ran across your blog.

    I just stumbled across it (did a Google search on Steve Ditko). As a result, I don’t know if this is an active blog, or not. I hope it is. I appreciate your writing style and, so far as I can tell, your basic philosophy as represented in your truncated bio.

    Anyhow, compliments from the aethers to you. It’s always nice to encounter a thinking being.

    Best,

    FAX

    1. Thanks for taking the time to comment, FAX. I appreciate it. Yes, the blog is still active. I don’t write as much as I used to, but that’s because I also have a YouTube channel that I’m working on. I try to get three blog posts a week, but it all depends on work and other responsibilities.

      Check out the YouTube channel when you get a chance. That might be up your alley as well. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s