A French father tells his young child that “flowers” can protect him from the Islamic State group. A teacher at a school run by ISIL hands children guns and instructs them to kill infidels.

Question: At what point does a man’s “peace at any cost” rhetoric become delusional, dangerous, and downright insulting to those who provide for the common defense?

French father flowersFrench father flowers 2French father flowers 3French flowers.jpgISIS Afghanistan schoolISIS Afghanistan infidel

The first interview came from Le Petit Journal. The second story comes from Frontline PBS’ “ISIS in Afghanistan.” In both cases, however, we see men at the far ends of an ideological spectrum.

In the case of the French father mourning last Friday’s terror attacks in Paris, he does a disservice to the child by inculcating a worldview that flat-out rejects the need for those who put their lives on the line to secure peace.

French SWAT doors

The death count in France stands at 129. How many more would have died if brave S.W.A.T. teams weren’t willing to charge into a room with men unloading AK-47s?

Police didn’t storm into the Bataclan concert hall with flowers — they went in with armor and their own weapons.

It is possible to ease a scared child’s mind without filling it with symbolic messages John Lennon would cheer after an acid trip.

Whether America and its allies want to admit it or not, we are in a clash of civilizations. World history is littered with lawlessness and tyranny. Western Civilization helped spark a period of time where universal human rights and the rule of law actually mattered. Freedom and liberty were never preserved by men with flowers because we live in a fallen world, and that is not about to change in the wake of the Paris terror attacks.

In order to maintain history’s few outposts of freedom, we will need to raise men and women who are up to task. Teaching children there is nothing worth fighting and dying for is a surefire recipe for failure.

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

11 comments

  1. It’s just bizarre, isn’t it?

    I’m chuckling a bit here, but whenever I get into these discussions on the internet, I am always deemed unreachable,unteachable, hateful…while those who wish us harm are given the benefit of the doubt, met with tolerance, assumed to be full of good intentions. Where’s my tolerance and mercy, where are my flowers?? 😉

    “It is possible to ease a scared child’s mind without filling its head with symbolic messages John Lennon would cheer after an acid trip.”

    Maybe, but it tends to just scare the heck out of people like me.

  2. The Frontline video, showing little kids being taught about their duty to wage holy war, as well as being taught to use assault rifles, automatic pistols, and hand grenades, is a perfect rebuttal to anyone who insists that “most of the refugees from the Middle East are women and children.”

    But, not to worry. The French have flowers. And we have “gun-free zone” signs at our schools.

    1. To me, the father’s words really are a slap in the face to all the police officers and first responders who charged toward the gunfire. France rightfully called the attack an “act of war.” Will the dad say that fighter jets are dropping flowers on ISIS positions? Sigh…

  3. Here’s the thing…I watched the video version of this, and I encourage folks to do the same. Everyone is spreading this as “sweet”, or “hopeful”, but to me it’s heartbreaking. I think there is a moment where you can see in the father’s eyes that *he knows that what he is telling his son is not true*. But what is he supposed to say? There is nothing truthful that he can tell his 3 year old to quell his fears. And so he lies, like parents do, and tells him everything is going to be ok.

    1. I agree with you that it’s possible to see the father’s own doubts about the message he’s sending, but I disagree that there is “nothing truthful” he can say. He could say that the “good guys” who stopped the attacks the first time will always be on guard to save the day when “bad guys” arrive. He can say that he, as the child’s father, will never let a “bad guy” harm him. Does any father doubt that he would become a human shield to save his own son’s life?

      This father may has well have said “happy thoughts” will keep them safe if he’s going to go there with flowers.

  4. Something I try to mention everywhere I can, it is Christian values that invented childhood itself. We’re very comfortable here in the West so some people don’t understand, but in many parts of the world kids must work for a living…or kill for a living. There is no real recognition of their humanity, no concept of sheltering them from the world until they are 18. That’s why they are often found working the streets or picking through garbage dumps or being trained as soldiers and martyrs. It astounds me that some people are not aware of this, that they don’t understand the different cultural values that we hold, and that Christianity has played a significant role in shaping those values.

    1. I was just having a similar conversation this morning with a friend who called himself a “citizen of the world.” I suggested he spend a few years in the countries people flee in an attempt to get to the U.S.

      Most Americans take freedom and liberty for granted and will only miss it when it is gone.

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