Marx

Imagine there was this guy named Steve Jobs. He had a vision for a computer company that he wanted to make. He had all sorts of ideas for weird devices he just knew in his heart people would love. He would call them the ‘iPad’ and ‘iPhone’ and ‘Mac’ (people would love it like the McDonald’s Big Mac, but this would actually raise the standard of living for hundreds-of-millions — perhaps billions of people — instead of cholesterol).

In order to achieve his dreams in a limited amount of time (who knows when we’ll kick the bucket — we can all die at any moment), he needed to raise a lot of money. He needed the freedom to run a company as he saw fit. He needed to pay himself and his employes what he believed would bring that dream closer to fruition. In short: He needed to do what he wanted with capital he acquired through legal means.

Enter egg-headed American Communist thugs who deny they are Communist thugs while selling tyranny as compassion:

Nearly everyone writing on the subject [of income inequality] agrees that inequality is increasing, and growing numbers of Americans are troubled by the trend. The question is what can be done about it.

Increases in wealth, inheritance, and incomes taxes certainly might do some good.

But not as much as imposing a maximum wage.

No, this isn’t some Marxist fantasy. It’s a clear-eyed response to the fact that in 2012 the ratio of CEO compensation to that of a typical worker in the United States was an astonishing 273-to-1. …

CNN columnist John D. Sutter has smartly suggested a maximum wage set at 100 times the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour (or $15,080 a year based on a 40-hour work week). That works out to a maximum of roughly $1.5 million a year.

Or if that’s too harsh, how about making it 200 times the minimum, raising the maximum to $3 million a year. Hell, we could even peg the maximum to 1,000 times the minimum wage — $15 million a year — and still allow CEOs to be filthy rich while reining in the most obscene excesses at the very top.

Now imagine that you’re Steve Jobs. What would you do? Because you’re a visionary, you might still accomplish your dreams, but there is no doubt that a very low ceiling has been placed over your head. And that ceiling, thanks to tyrannical thugs at mainstream media outlets across the nation, might not be one you can bust through.

Here is what Mike Fossum of the International Space Station said of Steve Jobs upon his death:

In every generation there are great thinkers and people that have the vision of what can be and then have the energy, the skill, and the genius to make it happen. Steve Jobs is definitely one of those rare individuals, and the world’s gonna miss him a lot,” —  Commander Mike Fossum of the International Space Station.

In an alternate reality, where guys like CNN columnist John D. Sutter and Marxists who deny they’re Marxists have had their way, Commander Mike Fossum of the International Space Station says this of Steve Jobs:

“Steve who?” — Commander Mike Fossum of the International Space Station; Communist Reality 616.

Everyone on earth has different dreams and ambitions. “Income inequality” can result from any number of things, and only greedy and envious losers who seems to think there is a giant money pot with a fixed amount of cash in it are interested in arbitrarily setting the wages a man can pay himself — at his own company.

Money does not matter to me. I honestly do not care about money, aside from being able to be my bills. I enjoy writing, and I’ve always said that I’d be happy working at Panera Bread as long as I could go home at the end of the day and write my blog, work on my book and dabble around in other creative endeavors.

However, because I don’t care about money, there is no doubt that I am making less than I would if I did make it a high priority. And yet, Communist thugs from ‘The Week,’ CNN analysts, and hacks like Paul Krugman use me — and others like me — in statistics to prove that I am “exploited” and that other men should be shackled from making large sums of money at their own companies. Why on earth would I care if someone like Mitt Romney makes millions of dollars a year in the private sector? Why should I care what men in the vein of Steve Jobs pay themselves in the finite amount of time they have to walk the planet? If a man’s goal is to experience what it feel like to make $10 billion while he walks the earth, I wish him the best of luck and do not want to see him hampered by envious individuals with less drive and determination than he.

There are many reasons why income may differ from person to person over time. None of them have anything to do with nefarious plots to keep “the poor” (as if “the poor” is a static group) poor. Fee markets — true free markets — are not zero-sums games. When one man profits, it does not necessarily mean that one man must lose something.

If a man makes his fortune through legal means, his hopes and dreams should not be encumbered by tyrants cloaked as compassionate saviors.

I posted Lee Doran’s take down of the ‘income inequality’ crowd before, but I think that it’s time to post his video again. I don’t like to throw the word ‘evil’ out very often, but a person who tries to convince others to voluntarily embrace tyranny and servitude is engaging in an evil act.

Advertisements

About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

29 comments

  1. Ugh, and just yesterday I watched as some catholics foolishly joined their side.
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/markshea/2014/04/legends-of-libertarianism.html

    (seriously, enjoy the comments)

    Some times when I read the Old Testament, I wonder how the Israelites couldn’t learn. They stop worshiping God – get invaded. Over and over and over again. It almost seems comical.

    Then I watch those who feed and sharpen leviathan’s teeth, only to cry when it turns and bites them. The monster finally starves and is forced to shrink, only for them to resume feeding and sharpening it again. Over and over and…

    Really at some point you just start laughing at it all.

    1. Nate, you always get me as I’m trying to get myself a Greek salad with chicken added…and a bowl of tomato soup! 🙂

      I will comment on the economics later, but for now I just have one observation: If you ever see a heavy set guy with a completely unkempt beard…he’s usually preaching liberalism.

      I love seeing Catholics who embrace the statist politicians who despise everything the Catholic Church stands for. It’s like walking up to a hangman, putting the loose around your neck, and saying: “Need practice?”

    2. lol it depends. Sometimes disheveled, sometimes not. Like how my accent grows thicker the more exhausted and tired I get, you can tell how close I’m getting to finishing up a writing project by how much I start morphing into a hippie.

    3. Actually I had a picture once… I’ll have to see if I can find it because it shows how much Jonah Goldberg and I could pass as brothers. Especially now that I’ve had to start wearing glasses.

  2. Is there no concern that this could lead to a job exodus from the US?

    While money cannot buy happiness it does motivate a lot of people and these people could easily decide to move to where a higher wage can be paid.

    1. These people do not care about jobs — they care about power. Like I said: they are tyrants cloaked as compassionate saviors. They are zealots who will do and say anything to get you to willing hang the noose around your own neck and then smile at the thought of your neck cracking.

  3. These idiot communists want to drive away business in this country and force them to move into other countries. That’s already happened, with some jobs being outsourced to other countries, and that’s what led to my mom being laid off from the job she held for 20 years in late 2005 (she got a new job that same year and has been there ever since, so no worries). Plus, this sort of thing also happens on a smaller level: many businesses move to states like Texas or Florida (to name just two examples) because they won’t be taxed to death there. Two Minnesota companies come to mind: Greyhound Bus was founded in and headquartered in Hibbing (up in the Iron Range) for years before it moved to its current location in Dallas in the mid-1980s. Honeywell (where my mom worked for 20 years) was founded in Minneapolis and moved its headquarters to New Jersey in 1999.

    And these same people… they’re obsessed with other people’s money. They think they’re “owed” it and it should be shared. I disagree, obviously. The government wastes so much of our tax money that I do not begrudge anyone who wishes to keep more of their hard-earned money.

    1. And don’t even get me started on Krugman. That guy is a total hack who likes to pretend he knows about economics, but in reality he just manipulates numbers to that they favor his liberal worldview.

  4. Maybe we should say find have your way, but you give your money up first…let’s see what happens. I find it fascinating how people feel they deserve what other people earn.

    Matthew 20
    New International Version (NIV)
    The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard
    20 “For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire workers for his vineyard. 2 He agreed to pay them a denarius[a] for the day and sent them into his vineyard.
    3 “About nine in the morning he went out and saw others standing in the marketplace doing nothing. 4 He told them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard, and I will pay you whatever is right.’ 5 So they went.
    “He went out again about noon and about three in the afternoon and did the same thing. 6 About five in the afternoon he went out and found still others standing around. He asked them, ‘Why have you been standing here all day long doing nothing?’
    7 “‘Because no one has hired us,’ they answered.
    “He said to them, ‘You also go and work in my vineyard.’
    8 “When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his foreman, ‘Call the workers and pay them their wages, beginning with the last ones hired and going on to the first.’
    9 “The workers who were hired about five in the afternoon came and each received a denarius. 10 So when those came who were hired first, they expected to receive more. But each one of them also received a denarius. 11 When they received it, they began to grumble against the landowner. 12 ‘These who were hired last worked only one hour,’ they said, ‘and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the work and the heat of the day.’
    13 “But he answered one of them, ‘I am not being unfair to you, friend. Didn’t you agree to work for a denarius? 14 Take your pay and go. I want to give the one who was hired last the same as I gave you. 15 Don’t I have the right to do what I want with my own money? Or are you envious because I am generous?’

  5. I am an artist by trade and a part-time athlete. I play music, I write comic books, and have education in personal training. Unfortunately I’m also a member of the Autism Spectrum Disorder family with my Asperger’s, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, and ADD.

    My wish isn’t to see a “maximum wage” so much as an equal opportunity to find employment in people’s fields, no matter how much they pay. Anybody can get a job in retail or general labour and they are given sufficient job training to perform that job. In many other low end jobs and internships where the most you do is fetch coffee for people and watch and take notes so that you can eventually move up into that spot, you are basically doing the same thing. Unfortunately they won’t even look twice at you if you don’t have 50 very expensive college degrees (and even then it’s dog eat dog) and doubly so if you are mentally handicapped regardless of your passion, insight, and knowledge in the field of which you choose to specialize in. My problem is that companies will only look at you if you have it in writing instead of showing just what you are capable of. We’ve become an age where we hire people based off of computer screens instead of interaction.

    But that’s another story for another time.

    My goals in life are to write comic books that people are willing and wanting to read, play music in front of crowds, and while my body still allows me, train others to find their own way and while not live as the richest person in the world, live comfortably so that when I decide to settle down and have kids of my own I don’t have to worry about living in squalor. Unfortunately all my chosen fields cost money and in fact you spend more money than you make. What I would like to see is a return to form of interacting with people instead of reading their qualifications off of a computer screen (because what is on paper doesn’t always, for better AND worse, reflect the individual applying) because we all need to take that crappy job to fund our dreams. I don’t care to be the richest man in the world with a mansion that could make Bruce Wayne look poor, have all the fanciest cars, I just want to be able to do what I do and get to a point that I make money off what I do so I don’t need to do those crappy jobs.

    So wage caps? I can understand why people would be envious, but what I’m more envious of is not the amount of money somebody makes, but the fact they are making money at all while countless others, especially those of us who already have tough times internally trying to stay down the straight and narrow, struggle endlessly to do the same, and come up with nothing or short-term gains.

    1. I am an artist by trade and a part-time athlete. I play music, I write comic books, and have education in personal training. Unfortunately I’m also a member of the Autism Spectrum Disorder family with my Asperger’s, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, and ADD.

      Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Matt. I appreciate it. I’m not sure how many posts you’ve been through, but I think you’ll find that I occasionally cover comic books as well…

      Unfortunately they won’t even look twice at you if you don’t have 50 very expensive college degrees (and even then it’s dog eat dog) and doubly so if you are mentally handicapped regardless of your passion, insight, and knowledge in the field of which you choose to specialize in. My problem is that companies will only look at you if you have it in writing instead of showing just what you are capable of. We’ve become an age where we hire people based off of computer screens instead of interaction.

      I’m not sure how old you are Matt, but I will say that when I was younger I went through some pretty dark days. It seemed like accomplishing my long-term goal was so far away…but I guess my advice would be to keep grinding it out. Keep plugging away. View the setbacks you face as preparation for the great things you will undoubtedly do later on in life. Every time you get knocked down, just take it as a learning experience. So many people give up moments before that light at the end of the tunnel was about to reveal itself. Don’t join that group of men who gave up right when victory was within reach.

      So wage caps? I can understand why people would be envious, but what I’m more envious of is not the amount of money somebody makes, but the fact they are making money at all while countless others, especially those of us who already have tough times internally trying to stay down the straight and narrow, struggle endlessly to do the same, and come up with nothing or short-term gains.

      Again, I can certainly empathize with you. I remember working night shifts and then going to school after I got off work in the morning for awhile…or having to work full time and take classes full time in graduate school (while kids whose mommies and daddies picked up the tab didn’t have to work at all). I think the proper mindset is to simply view every obstacle as a learning opportunity. Be thankful for the hard times. I know that sounds rather strange, but if you believe in your heart that you’re going to be in place “x” years from now, then there really is no need to worry. You can look at every situation and say, “Okay, well how do I learn from this and use it to my advantage.”

      I think there’s simply a mental switch that a lot of people need to find in the dark of their mind. When you find it and turn it on, all sorts of possibilities open up.

  6. Matt Robert McKenzie, I understand your pain to a degree. I grew up incredibly poor and it is easy to get jealous, but instead I decided to work hard and I refused to let things get me down. I will all people to have an equal opportunity and I do many things to help with that. I help many people each year to find a job, I also help hundreds of people a year with financial planning (all free of charge). I am a very big proponent of helping others. With that said I wish you the best and I pray for you on your journey for success.

    1. Thank you, I am a big fan of the American dream. If only we realized how fortunate we are.

  7. The people who want to raise the minimum wage are clueless; my sister, naturally, is one of them since she works at dead-end jobs (at a gas station deli now) and thinks people owe her higher wages, “since I make your food and do all the work, but you people don’t appreciate me and are selfish and greedy and unpatriotic because you think I deserve to be paid less.” (this is from a Facebook post my dad read out loud to me over the summer) They do not understand basic economics or anything about business, for that matter. Their “understanding,” such that it is, mostly comes from left-wing Facebook memes and Tweets. They fail to understand the jobs that will be lost if that were to happen, and how this will cause the prices of fast food to go up, and people aren’t going to pay that much money for it.

    Plus, fast food jobs and the like were not meant to be full-time jobs for the rest of your life. They meant to be entry-level jobs for when you’re in high school, nothing more. Politicians such as Obama and other liberals are promoting it to get yet another voting block for the Democrats, the unmotivated fast food workers who don’t want to improve their lives and stay stuck in limbo.

    Hell, Minneapolis is trying to raise the minimum wage laws within its city limits, because its liberal mayor made it one of her top priorities. I kid you not.

    1. I think your sister fails to understand is that it’s not that she’s being denied appreciation (I’m sure most decent people say “thanks” when she hands them their food), but that pretty much anyone can make a ham sandwich — but very few people can have a dream about a thing called “iPad” … and then invent the product. Almost anyone can pump gas (Commie New Jersey won’t allow me to pump my own gas…), but not everyone can manage a gas station. I don’t think her moral self worth is any less than the guy next to her, but I think the human capital she brings to her job is probably quite a bit less than, say, the owner of the gas station.

      My siblings and I started working when we were 16 years old. I started at a little vegetable stand on the side of the highway unloading huge burlap bags of corn onto a table all day. Then I worked at a Walgreens as a cashier. After I got out of the Army I worked at Target stocking shelves during the overnight shift to help put myself through college. When I was in graduate school I mopped up sweat off gym equipment, but I was determined to be the best darn sweat-mopper that gym had ever seen. Eventually, the guy who ran the place saw me…and after talking to me about my past, my future, etc. … he made me a manager — even though there was at least one other manager who wasn’t on board with the idea. I think I did a pretty darn good job, and as a result a nice chuck of my graduate school payments were taken care of by the university.

      I guess my point is this: Attitude matters, and it sounds like your sister has a rotten attitude. Drive, determination, a good work ethic, a pleasant attitude, honesty, and integrity are a recipe for success. The person who possesses all of those things will do pretty darn well for themselves in the long run. Sure, there may be jerky bosses here and there, but good people with specific goals generally do an excellent job of ticking them off the list.

    2. “I think your sister fails to understand is that it’s not that she’s being denied appreciation (I’m sure most decent people say “thanks” when she hands them their food), but that pretty much anyone can make a ham sandwich — but very few people can have a dream about a thing called “iPad” … and then invent the product. Almost anyone can pump gas (Commie New Jersey won’t allow me to pump my own gas…), but not everyone can manage a gas station. I don’t think her moral self worth is any less than the guy next to her, but I think the human capital she brings to her job is probably quite a bit less than, say, the owner of the gas station.”

      You’re correct that pretty much anyone can do her job (hell, I’ve known how to make sandwiches my whole life; it’s not hard to do) and as such the human capital is significantly less than say that of the gas station’s owner/manager. I

      She doesn’t understand the concept of hard work or anything like that; she thinks she’s “owed” everything, and so does her loser boyfriend, who quits job after job because of “social anxiety” and goes back to laying around his mother’s house (where they recently moved) doing absolutely nothing, other than smoking pot.

      I’m not going to play the blame game, nor am I implying favoritism on our parents’ part, but I’ve often wondered if her poor attitude stems from my parents being a bit more lenient with her than they were with me. It seemed like she could worm her way out of punishment pretty easily. Not that I got into trouble that often (I was only ever grounded twice growing up, and both times it was for bad grades in a couple of classes) but when I was, it was made clear that I would remain punished until my grades improved.

    3. What I mean by that is that she do something stupid (such as calling substitute teachers “bitches” to their faces), get grounded for it and then cry crocodile tears and smile her pretty little smile and then it would seem like all was magically forgiven. One time where my parents grounded her indefinitely was after she helped a few of her “friends” create a fake Myspace page to harass some girl.

      I’m not going to blame my parents, though; this was just something I would observe. I love my folks. A big part of it was my aunts trying to turn her against my dad, whom they’ve always hated.

  8. Two years later, and the situation hasn’t improved much, if it at all. My sister’s still nasty, and she’s basically Un-Personed my parents and I by unfriending us on Facebook. And my parents still can’t or won’t admit that their treating her with kid gloves while we were growing up is a big reason why she’s turned out the way she has. My parents (my dad in particular) have always pretty hard on me compared to her and I just don’t get it. I feel like I should confront them about it, but I don’t feel like it’s my place to critique their parenting since I don’t have kids of my own.

    1. “My parents (my dad in particular) have always pretty hard on me compared to her and I just don’t get it. I feel like I should confront them about it, but I don’t feel like it’s my place to critique their parenting since I don’t have kids of my own.”

      My two cents, for what it’s worth: I wouldn’t confront them on it. I’m sure that if your sister is giving the family a hard time (to put it lightly), they already second-guess themselves behind closed doors. There are so many variables at work in terms of forming someone’s political identity that even if you have a point, it’s still just one part of the equation.

      I’m not sure if your sister will ever come around. Just keep taking the high road and maybe it will happen. If not, then it’s her loss.

    2. Thanks for the advice. I apologize if I’m cluttering the comments sections of your posts with this stuff, but I needed to say this. My dad and I got into an argument earlier today and I almost brought up how he and my mom treated my sister differently, but refrained since the argument was already pretty heated. I won’t confront them about it, per your advice.

      Don’t get me wrong; I love my parents, but I’d be remiss if I didn’t point out the fact that my sister always seemed to get away with things I never could, and how she could worm her way out of punishment by smiling and crying crocodile tears. It’s been eating at me for a while, and hearing my mom and dad wondering aloud where they went wrong with her irritates me because I think I know the answer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s