Self Defense

Think about men like Michael Bloomberg for a moment, who wake up occasionally in the middle of the night crying tears of joy — the after-effects of dreaming that all Americans are stripped of their Second Amendment rights. Now, think of the Milwaukie, Oregon intruder who kept trying to break into homes until he finally succeeded — at which point he asked a poor woman if she wanted to “meet God.”

KGW Newschannel 8 reports from Portland.

Before trying to get in the home, the man had reportedly walked in two other apartments. In one, he followed Crystal McKinney upstairs and inside.

She knew something wasn’t right.

“I backed up and I said ‘What are you doing?'” McKinney said. “He said, ‘Do you want to meet God?’ I went to my room and got my gun. I said get out or I will shoot you.”

She said the man turned to leave, so she followed him, shut the door, and called 911. Then she heard him in the apartment across the hall before he finally left.

“My adrenaline was really pumping and I broke down in tears,” McKinney said.

She broke down into tears because that’s the sort of thing that happens when your mind realizes all the gruesome things that could have happened to you during a home invasion — if men like Michael Bloomberg had their twisted dreams realized on a national level. Mikey probably lives on the top floor of a penthouse that has 24-hour security manning the entrance to the building. Maybe he even has a panic room, since that’s the sort of thing billionaires sometimes splurge on.

Ms. McKinney? Without her gun she might have a phone, which she could use to call the cops. Maybe they’d come in time, maybe not. When seconds count, the cops are only minutes away.

Hooded Man

Whenever gun debates take control of cable news, it’s always interesting to listen to rich, well-dressed and emasculated men wearing Brooks Brothers suits as they denigrate women like Ms. McKinney. (Did you get the Brooks Brothers Signature Tartan Slim Briefcase for the emasculated gun-control nut in your family? They’re only $448!) The gun debate is one that they will continue to have a tough time on because there will always be nut-jobs threatening innocent people, and innocent people like being able to defend their life, liberty and property.

Oddly enough, I was talking with my brother this morning and told him that if anyone ever stuck a gun to my head that any tears I would shed would be because I’d feel bad for the pain my family would go through — not because I was afraid of dying. On some level I’d laugh at a guy who asked if I wanted to “meet God” because I know I’ll be just fine. I’ve been trying to play long ball with my soul for quite some time; the same can’t be said for the intruder who threatens to murder innocent Americans at gunpoint. Regardless, I still have the right to defend my life — and putting a bullet through the head of those who seek to end it is not up for debate.

If you’ve never seen it, watch as Ted Nugent intellectually destroys a guy who probably owns the Brooks Brothers “Small Foldover Manicure Set” (only $98!)

Editor’s note: In full disclosure, the author does own a number of Brooks Brothers ties. Like the Joker’s poison from Tim Burton’s Batman, men are only emasculated by Brooks Brothers clothing when they mix it with specific behavioral patterns (e.g., buying into the Bloombergian gun control mindset).

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

17 comments

  1. The gun grabbers in this country hate self-defense. They would rather people just sit back and die than let have people defend themselves, because you should “wait for the police to come,” to quote a crazy relative of mine from around the time Sandy Hook took place. Usually, when people DO fight back against thuggery, they get punished for doing so.

    1. I hope this never happens to your aunt, but I have a feeling that she would change her mind about calling the cops being the only permissible option if she woke up one night and some thug was breaking into her home. “Wait” doesn’t cut it for most people when they need help “now.”

    2. I’d be curious to know if the “knock out” instances occur in places with stricter gun laws.

    3. Well, Chicago, the murder capital of the world, has some of the if not THE most restrictive gun laws in the worlds, so it wouldn’t surprise me if that was the case.

    4. I was mostly raised in Chicago area, I agree the gun laws are very restrictive. The murders are concentrated on the south and west sides (much like the days of Al Capone)….for the most part, for a big city, you had to find trouble as opposed to it finding you as seems to happen more on the east coast. I can’t say I follow Chicago news like I used to, but I get the vibe Rahm has his hands full!

    5. Most “knockout games” occur in jurisdictions that have strict anti-gun laws (Chicago, New York, New Jersey). St. Louis is the exception (MO has “shall issue” concealed carry as well as a Stand-Your-Ground law), but I’d bet that, even there, thugs carefully choose victims who are obviously unlikely to be armed.

    1. Sorry. Meant ‘rebuking’. I don’t even know what the action of ‘rebutting’ would look like…and unless I lived in San Fran or NYC…I wouldn’t want to know.

  2. Someone gave me a weapon a couple of years ago, and while glad to have it, thought, “I’m sure I will never actually need this.” When a job 30 years ago required that I be certified in CPR, sometime during the instruction, I thought, “I’m sure I will never actually need this.”

    Well, two years ago, a man installing flooring in my home fell over dead of a heart attack. Without hesitation, I used that CPR training and saved him. Also in the past two years since receiving the weapon, I have indeed felt the need to have it handy when feeling threatened. Thankfully, so far I have not needed it, but am certainly glad I have it just in case.

    Funny thing is, the same person whose life I saved with a skill I thought I’d never use, is the same one who gave me the gun I hope I will never use… and I’m very happy to have both!

    1. Wow. Amazing story. Thanks goodness you were around for that guy.

      See, that’s my thing — I don’t begrudge anyone if they don’t feel comfortable with a gun. That’s their call. However, unlike Michael Bloomberg, I don’t want to strip people of their right to defend their life, liberty and property. If I lived in an area where people tried to sneak up from behind innocent victims, club them over the head and steal their belongings … I’d a.) be very alert at all times, and b.) carrying a weapon.

  3. Crystal McKinney’s case is fairly common, in that the intruder ran away when confronted by an armed citizen. In 98% of self-defense cases, the gun is not even fired once. I am kind of nervous about pointing that out publicly, though, because I’m afraid someone might think, “Great, I’ll just keep an empty gun and use it to scare the burglar away.” That won’t work. As Bat Masterson said, “Never try to run a bluff with a six-gun.” Criminals can instinctively tell when you’re bluffing, just as a wolf can smell your fear. Criminals don’t fear guns, they fear armed, determined people who are willing to fight back.

  4. When seconds count, the police are minutes (or hours) away.

    That’s why most married cops have handguns stashed around the house so their wives (who are trained) can be safe.

    1. Yeah, that’s what I told my anti-gun relative, but she said that, “the police know what they are doing and always get there on time.” I couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

    2. As if 900, 000 police officers could protect 300 million civilians from 10 million criminals. Even cops (and firefighters and EMT’s) make jokes about, “Dial 911 and then call Dominoes and order a pizza, and see which one arrives first.”

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