Muslims supporting death penalty

The Washingon Post’s coverage of a Pew poll on the world’s Muslim’s is one of the funniest things I’ve read in awhile.

Poor Max Fisher doesn’t know what to do with himself:

According to Pew’s data, 78 percent of Afghan Muslims say they support laws condemning to death anyone who gives up Islam. In both Egypt and Pakistan, 64 percent report holding this view. This is also the majority view among Muslims in Malaysia, Jordan and the Palestinian territories.

It’s important to note, though, that this view is not widely held in all Muslim countries or even among Muslims in these regions. In Bangladesh, another majority Muslim South Asian state that has a shared heritage with Pakistan, it is about half as prevalent, with 36 percent saying they support it. Fewer than one in six Tunisian Muslims hold the view, as do fewer than one in seven Muslims in Lebanon, which has a strong Christian minority. …

It’s also important to note that majorities of Muslims in the countries surveyed, sometimes vast majorities, said they support religious freedom. That includes, for example, more than 75 percent of Egyptians and more than 95 percent of Pakistanis. It might seem like a glaring contradiction. And it is a contradiction, but it might make a little more sense that so many people could hold seemingly mutually exclusive views — religious freedom is good, but anyone who leaves Islam should be executed — if one understands the particular history of apostasy in Islam.

How sad is it when a guy has to put a smiley face on the fact that only 36% of Bangladesh’s Muslim population wants you dead if you leave the faith. And hey, only 16.6% of Tunisians feel the same way.

The topper is that “sometimes vast majorities” of Muslims in these countries “support religious freedom.” Got it. And by “got it” I mean I do not. But that’s okay too, because Mr. Fisher assures us that we all need to do is a better job understanding the history of Islam; once we do that we’ll be good to go.

Remember when Bill Maher generally destroyed deranged liberal professor Brian Levin of California State University in San Bernardino after the Boston terror attack? I do. It was classic:

“I mean, there’s only one faith, for example, that kills you or wants to kill you if you draw a bad cartoon of the prophet. There’s only one faith that kills you or wants to kill you if you renounce the faith. An ex-Muslim is a very dangerous thing. Talk to Salman Rushdie after the show about Christian versus Islam … So, you know, I’m just saying, let’s keep it real.”

Bill Maher essentially states the cold hard truth that the Pew poll shows quantitatively, and the professor’s response is, for all intents and purposes: “I have a nice Muslim dentist.”

Bill Maher points out that no one would be able to write “The Book of Islam” as a musical, and the professor’s only comeback is “I have nice Muslim students.” And yet, at the end of the segment the two are giving each other high-fives when they agree that the primary reason why militias and patriot groups have been created in great numbers since President Obama took office is probably because “white guys don’t want to see a black guy on Air Force One.” Interesting.

Here’s a question for The Washington Post: How come liberal feminists like the ones who assaulted Archbishop Andre-Joseph Leonard never seem to pull that sort of stunt with the local imam? How come they don’t bust into the local mosque topless? There must be a reason. I wonder…

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to go to bed. It’s late, and I have an old friend from The Heritage Foundation I’m meeting for breakfast. Maybe the answer will come to me while I sleep.

Related: Ben Affleck is Batman, but he can’t even confront Bill Maher on Islam without almost crying

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

23 comments

  1. In the words of great Chechen m̶a̶r̶t̶y̶r̶ coward, “LOL”. Funny article Doug, keep ’em coming.

  2. Doug asked “How come liberal feminists like the ones who assaulted Archbishop Andre-Joseph Leonard never seem to pull that sort of stunt with the local imam? How come they don’t bust into the local mosque topless? There must be a reason. I wonder…”

    Maybe one of the liberals frequenting this site can answer this question or shed some light? I’m honestly curious.. why does the left continually preach tolerance of Islam, which punishes with DEATH the acts of adultery, apostasy, blasphemy, and homosexuality. A christian man can’t even go on ESPN and state his opinion about homosexuality WHEN ASKED without a complete backlash from liberals. Which, by the way, was not “He should be killed.” I. do. not. understand.

    1. Eve, there is a wide spectrum of devotion among the billion or so followers of some form of Islam. if less killing is something we can broadly agree would be a good thing, then it would be worth remembering that extremists of all faiths are in the extreme minority.

    2. Doug’s post was about the pew poll which shows Islam’s support for Sharia, law given by Allah, which includes all of the above I mentioned and much much more, ie “a women’s testimony is worth half the testimony of a man” WHAT?! That’s not extremism according to the statistics. Which is why I ask the question, why are liberals so soft on Islam and unrelenting when it comes to Christianity? On a side note, our extremists wear denim skirts and have long hair, not exactly terrifying if you ask me.

    3. Eve, you opened yourself up there. Let me beat Lizard to the punch. See, what he’ll do is note some random abortion clinic bomber and then somehow try and make the case that the “Christian Taliban” is really upon us if we were to just open our eyes. If Mike Huckabee had his way, you’d be brought to a soccer field and executed. Oh … wait … that was the real Taliban that did that. Never mind.

    4. I do inform myself Eve, and I suggest you do the same. I think supporting radicals and terrorists is not smart US foreign policy, but we’ve been doing it for decades. I suggest watching Adam Curtis’ BBC documentary The Power of Nightmares if you want a little more context to what’s happening right now in the world.

    5. Based on the wikipedia entry, looks like a great movie. Especially the part that states the release was delayed due to the London bombings 😉

    6. You’ll have to watch it Eve, if only for the ominous music. The creepier the music when talking about “neocons,” the more true it is. That’s the rule.

      Side note: Ask 10 different people to define “neocon” for you and you’ll get 10 different definitions. That’s because it’s one of those terms only pseudo-intellectuals to try and convince people they actually know what they’re talking about.

    7. You’ll notice, Eve, that Lizard19 skated around your question.

      I thought that whole ESPN thing was rather bizarre as well. They asked the analyst his opinion, he gave it (rather tactfully, I might add), and suddenly the network is apologizing. Unreal.

  3. Hey Doug, what do you think about Cosmic Justice? I.E. the whole slaughtering of the Canaanites and the Sodom and Gomorrah thing?

    1. I’m not a big fan of debating religious texts, so I’ll stick to your broader question about “Cosmic Justice” instead.

      Are there universal truths that govern the universe? I’d say yes. It is quite plain to me that people, by and large, do reap what they sow. If you live a life of evil and wickedness, then you will find yourself dealing with the consequences of that. If you surround yourself with good people, you will more often than not find yourself in the company of happiness.

      Personally, I try not to concern myself too much with the failings of other men when I have plenty of my own to deal with. I know my own vices, so I spend the bulk of my time trying becoming the best “me” I can. I’m not opposed to commenting on the culture at large (hence, my blog), but you’re never going to find me saying that God is going to smite “x” person to hell for “x” activity. That’s between God and “Person X” to figure out. Why would I go off the rails on someone about their spiritual fate when I have my own to worry about? I try and be humble before God, atone for my sins and make the most of the life that I’ve been given. I try not to point at the splinter in my neighbor’s eye when I have logs in my own.

      Like most people, at some point in time all the stuff you’re told to parrot about God as a kid becomes meaningless because as an adult you have to figure it out for yourself. Everyone has that period of time (months, days, years) where they sort out their beliefs about God, the afterlife, etc. I was confirmed in the Catholic church, but in some sense it didn’t matter because my REAL conversion happened years later — when I turned inward, asked tough questions, and in the end came out with my faith intact.

      When I veered from God as a young man and as an adult, it came back to sting me in the butt. When I “got right with God,” my life really came into focus. People came into my life who helped me attain my goals. I formed friendships with individuals who saved my butt when I needed it. I used to have an inner sadness that disappeared as I exercised my faith. A tense and anxious man became much more calm… There’s no way for me to really explain these things to an atheist, but I “know” in my heart that God is real. I don’t need some 150 page equation to “prove” He exists. To me, every waking moment I see proof of God’s existence. I’m not sure how people can miss it, but that’s on them.

      I’m not sure if that answers your question. I just really don’t like debating religious texts too much. For one, human beings are imperfect. That means our language is imperfect. How do you use an imperfect language to describe something that is perfect? You can’t. Something will always be lost in translation. Every time I see two people who believe in God going after each other like rabid dogs over a biblical passage, I cringe. I’m sure atheists and agnostics are sitting in the back row with their popcorn having a grand old time.

    1. Sorry, man. Not going there anytime soon. That’s just not my thing. As I said:

      I just really don’t like debating religious texts too much. For one, human beings are imperfect. That means our language is imperfect. How do you use an imperfect language to describe something that is perfect? You can’t. Something will always be lost in translation. Every time I see two people who believe in God going after each other like rabid dogs over a biblical passage, I cringe. I’m sure atheists and agnostics are sitting in the back row with their popcorn having a grand old time.

    2. Personally, I don’t do that, either. The Hebrew conquest of the Canaanites happened so long ago, circa 1400 B.C. and it was a different world back then, so we can’t judge them by modern standards.

    3. Same with the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah… since it is believed to have happened circa 2000 B.C., I’m going to withhold judgement on it.

    4. I just don’t want to get into a conversation about the eternal fate of random gay men, what the biblical definition of “perversion” is, etc. When I read the Bible I say to myself “Okay, what is the lesson I’m supposed to learn from this passage? What can I do to bring myself closer rather than farther away from God?” I don’t try and parse every word to death so that I can take to the streets and tell random groups of people they’re going to hell…

      I think anyone who reads the Bible and seriously thinks about God will get their moral compass working pretty well. We’re never going to come to an agreement on everything that’s in the Bible, but if we focus more energy on becoming a better individual than on condemning the guy next to us … then I think we’ll shape a pretty nice world for ourselves.

    5. And remember, too, that genocide was considered a normal- and justifiable- practice back then. All sorts of cultures engaged in it.

    6. I too had lapsed in my 20s, one of the kickstarts to me getting back into church, and examining myself, was an old employee of mine named Rick. He definitely lived his faith and invited me to his church, which was more evangelical. Hearing that message and my own reading got me back into my raised Catholic faith. I’m not sure that happens without Rick. I still meet him for dinner occasionally to catch up and discuss our faith. As Doug said, it is impossible to explain to someone without faith, but I felt people (like Rick for me) are put in our lives by a higher power. Despite our differences, me and Rick recognize our religion’s central message and realize we’re on the same team. None of this happens if we argued like rabid dogs, which historically would have been the case (as Doug states, humans are imperfect). The infighting benefits those with the popcorn in Doug’s comment.

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