Samuel L Jackson Nick Fury
Sameul L. Jackson believes that we don’t teach people the “value of life” today. Oddly enough, he’s also the guy who would freak out if conservatives started talking about social issues. (Image: Marvel)

It wasn’t too long ago that Samuel L. Jackson was telling American voters to “wake the f**k up.” Do you know who can’t wake up, Samuel? Dead people. More specifically, dead people whose lives were extinguished because a mentally deranged person riddled their bodies with bullets. And so, it doesn’t surprise me that with Django Unchained about to open you’re doing everything within your power to direct attention away from this fact: You’ve made millions of dollars due to depictions of graphic violence on the big screen.

“I don’t think it’s about more gun control. I grew up in the South with guns everywhere and we never shot anyone. This [shooting] is about people who aren’t taught the value of life … I don’t think movies or video games have anything to do with it. … We need to stop deranged people from getting access to guns,” (Samuel L. Jackson).

Where are people taught about life, Samuel? Parents. The family. The local community. Religious institutions. Those are all places where it is imperative that individuals be instilled with the kinds of values most likely to produce upstanding citizens. But the mosaic of influences at work on the individual psyche includes another part: popular culture.

Who determines what’s “cool,” Samuel? Where do our young people turn at a time when their minds are like little sponges, soaking up the values that will stay with them the rest of their lives? The answer: Hollywood. And while I think the impact is negligible when an individual comes from a loving attentive family, the same can’t be said for the kids who come home from school every day to an empty household. (Mom and Dad both work.) Or maybe there is no mom. Maybe there is no dad. Maybe there is a mom and dad, but other factors (e.g., alcohol, drugs) leave their parenting skills in shambles. The point is this: The entertainment industry cannot escape culpability if liberals are going to frame any conversation about shooting rampages on a “gun culture.”

Question, Samuel: Wouldn’t respecting the “value of life” begin by not calling the extermination of millions of children “choice”? Shouldn’t respecting the value of life begin with the most innocent and helpless among us? If we chased the falling public policy dominoes back to the first one tipped over, do you think it might begin with abortion? Just wondering. Maybe instead of talking about a “gun culture” we should talk about the “abortion culture.”

Hand
Does the “Hand of Hope” story tie in with gun violence? I believe it does, perhaps more than we’d like to admit. (Image: Fox News)

It’s hard to look at the 21-week old hand of a “fetus” and really believe it’s “just a fetus.” To stick with the dominoes analogy, it’s a human life that has been set in motion. It’s not just some random collection of cells. It’s not just a mistake or “punishment”. It’s life. And if actors like Samuel L. Jackson want to talk about valuing life, then it would be nice if they weighed in on abortion more often. But they won’t, because a guy like Mr. Jackson — who admits he only voted for President Obama because of the color of his skin — is never asked tough questions. With the right letter after your name you are rarely thrust into embarrassing Q&A sessions. Nobody asks you if God would prefer if babies conceived during rape were dead. Nobody asks if that little hand of Samuel Armas clutching the doctor’s finger stirs something inside you that screams: “This is so much more than I was led to believe! This is real. This is a human being and someone needs to stand up for its right to life.”

As a conservative, I’m repeatedly told not to talk about social issues. And then there is a mass shooting and guys like Samuel L. Jackson say that it’s because we “aren’t taught the value of life.” Well, whether you want to talk about abortion or not, the statement essentially demands that social issues come up. So which is it, Samuel? Should the crazy conservative shut up and not talk about social issues, or are you going to try and say with a straight face that “the value of life” can be talked about without broaching subjects along the lines of faith, family and religion?

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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

21 comments

  1. Right on, my brother.
    Right on. Bravo!
    They have no compassion for the 2000 children per day murdered in the US by liberals and their policies.

    The sooner Jackson receives the remainder of his botched lobotomy, the better.

    Brilliant post.

    1. Thanks, man. It just annoys me that social issues are supposed to be off the table, but then a shooting massacre happens and we’re lectured by liberals like Jackson about missing values. Classic.

      The reason why so many people want to blame inanimate objects is because it’s a lot easier than talking about social issues. They’d much rather talk about a gun being responsible for murder than the underlying cultural problems serving as an incubator for tragedy.

    2. Like Piers Morgan… he’s =been going off about how the U.S. “needs” gun control now that the massacre at CT happened. People I know are blaming the gun, rather than the societal problems… like you said, it’s easier for them to blame inanimate objects than to address the social issues. They also say he was bullied, but thing is, I was bullied myself (for having a disability) in middle school and that didn’t make me want to kill my tormentors. That thought never at any point occurred to me.

  2. Jackson offers a perfectly reasonable quote about keeping guns out of the hand of lunatics and you go off on a tangent about abortion, Hollywood, a lack of values, and morality in general based on a snippet of the quote about “respecting life.” Hollywood and fantasy actors are somehow a causal factor of morality issues? The fault is party genetic predisposition but mostly parental guidance. Hollywood is a scapegoat. Who gives their kids access to entertainment? Parents.

    Mining a few words out of a perfectly reasonable quote and launching to a thinly-related “empty chair” diatribe sound loony and turn off your reader. At least this one. I’m certainly open to an honest discussion about the topic, but this red meat post is rancid.

    That’s honest feedback, not some troll’ish rebuttal.

    1. Here’s some honest feedback for you: Hahaha!

      And while I think the impact is negligible when an individual comes from a loving attentive family, the same can’t be said for the kids who come home from school every day to an empty household. (Mom and Dad both work.) Or maybe there is no mom. Maybe there is no dad. Maybe there is a mom and dad, but other factors (e.g., alcohol, drugs) leave their parenting skills in shambles. The point is this: The entertainment industry cannot escape culpability if liberals are going to frame any conversation about shooting rampages on a “gun culture.”

      Seems like a “perfectly reasonable” quote that concedes that Jackson had a “perfectly reasonable” quote. Unfortunately, Sam’s little press conference is laughable coming from a guy who has made a mint starring in ultraviolet films.

      You just don’t like when I talk about social issues. At all. I’m not even sure what a reasonable “MeAgain” discussion involving faith and family would look like. Basically, anything I say is “red meat” to you if it delves in God or abortion.

      Loony? Fine. Then go somewhere else. Rancid? Please, if that’s how you feel, go away. No one is forcing you to come here.

      You could have had an honest discussion, but chose not to. Instead of saying privately to yourself, “I think this is crazy, but I want to figure out why Doug believes this,” you simply said it was looney. That’s your prerogative. But that kind of “honest feedback” says more about you than it does about what I’ve written.

    2. One of my closest friends told me my (admittedly primitive) song composition was utter crap the other day. Did I laugh? Did I whine? Did I tell him to get lost? No. I can take criticism. Even the harsh kind. Man up.

      How did Jackson (a filthy liberal) frame the conversation about rampages on “gun culture?”

      Maybe I can use your Rush excuse and say he’s intervewed an awful lot and expressed himself poorly.

    3. {…Loony? Fine. Then go somewhere else. Rancid? Please, if that’s how you feel, go away. No one is forcing you to come here….}
      I second that emotion 🙂

    4. The word you’re looking for is “sentiment,” not “emotion.”

      Unless you like Smokey Robinson and the Miracles.

  3. Here’s some red meat about your action hero, Stallone:

    “Look at what’s happening in America’s inner-cities. If our hopeless legal system continues going the same liberal direction, there will be anarchy before long. We need one person in an influential position to stand up and tell the truth about gun control lobbies, the death penalty and that our criminal justice system basically stinks.”
    Sylvester Stallone, interview in Cinefantastique magazine, June 1995

    “until America, door to door, takes every handgun, this is what you’re gonna have… It really is pathetic… We’re livin’ in the Dark Ages over there.”
    Sylvester Stallone, March 28, 1998

    “I know we use guns in films,” but insisted the time has come “to be a little more accountable and realize that this is an escalating problem that’s eventually going to lead to, I think, urban warfare.”
    Sylvester Stallone on Access Hollywood, June 8, 1998

    “It [2nd Amendment] has to be stopped, and someone really has to go on the line, a certain dauntless political figure, and say, ‘It’s ending, it’s over, all bets are off. It’s not 200 years ago, we don’t need this anymore, and the rest of the world doesn’t have it. Why should we?”
    Sylvester Stallone on Access Hollywood, June 8, 1998

    1. So what. I never said Stallone was a paragon of conservative thought. Did you see him out on the campaign trail? I didn’t. In 2008 or 2012 or any time for that matter.

      I’ve been quite open about cutting actors slack who don’t go out of their way to shove their politics down my throat. When Stallone hits the stump for conservatives I’ll start dissecting his politics.

      Don’t you have somewhere else to be? I thought this post was rancid to you?

    2. Oh, really?

      Stallone openly endorsed Romney. Google it.

      And McCain…

      My turn to laugh. The guy’s OPENLY AND EXPLICITLY anti-gun and makes a living off of violent movies. Much easier to make a case of gun culture hypocrisy against him. But Hollywood is bad, unless it stumps for my guy. Right?

    3. So Stallone was promoting Rambo, was asked by Brian Kilmeade who he was supporting, he replies that it’s McCain “but that it might change along the way,” and that’s what you’ve got? Really? Okay. That’s a far cry from “Wake the F**k Up!” (“Romney doesn’t believe in a safety net…”)

    4. There is no getting through to you. We’ll agree to disagree. I didn’t read his take as a slight on gun culture or on our culture in general. You did. Jackson is fairly liberal, no doubt, but I didn’t read that in his quote.

    5. Then why attribute it to him? That’s what I don’t get. Why not speak about those who said it directly? The “explain to me, Samuel” empty chair bit was beneath you, and your writing is usually much better than that.

      You’d find that I agree with you on the gun issue, though I wouldn’t use some of your arguments.

    6. I tweeted this piece to Mr. Jackson. Given that I’ve had people like Jason Alexander mockingly call me a “genius” in response to my tweets (I wish I had video!), it’s not out of the realm of possibility to think he’d read it. You didn’t like this piece. Eh. Like I said, you generally don’t like it when I talk about social issues. Maybe one day I’ll write that abortion post that makes you say “Bravo!” but … I doubt it.

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