Rest in peace, Hostess. If it’s any consolation, everyone knows who your murderer is. He did it right out in the open. It’s as simple as pie stuffing: murder by union.

The Twinkie is dead — and unions killed it. Correction: Hostess is dead — and unions killed it. 18,000 people are now well on their way to collecting 99 weeks of unemployment checks, and it’s because the Bakery, Confectionery, and Tobacco workers and the Grain Millers International Union never listened to Kenny Rogers: “You got to know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em, know when to walk away, know when to run.”

Well, now the dealing is done, and the people who provided food for their families by providing pie filling for Hostess confectionery treats  (Or was that the union bosses who all look like they gorge themselves on Twinkies?) found out how the class warfare rhetoric of goons like AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka plays out in real life. The last Ding Dong hasn’t been purchased off the Target shelves and he’s already referencing “Bain Capital” in his Twinkie attacks.

No, Mr. Trumka, the problem is not Bain Capital. The problem is guys like you. And Howard Dean:

“I think the debate for the new generation, instead of capitalism or socialism, is we’re going to have both, and then which proportion of each should we have in order to make this all work,” (Howard Dean, April 5, 2009, Paris, France).

There it is. Like the vampires they are, unions and their liberal allies suck the lifeblood out of companies as much as possible, while leaving just enough to continue to keep them alive. In the case of Hostess, they sucked on the jugular for far too long, and now the company is a corpse. The union bosses will move on to the next company in the next state.

Ask yourself: How do you simultaneously have capitalism and socialism? Answer: You don’t. It doesn’t work if your goal is to maximize individual liberty. The two are fundamentally different worldviews, and when you try and come up with some magical mixture of the two, like Howard Dean, you end up with $16 trillion dollars in debt, entitlement programs on autopilot and politicians who don’t have the courage to confront economic ticking time bombs in the making.

In the past few days I’ve heard multiple liberal outlets try to make the case that the Bush era tax rates are primarily to blame for our national debt. It’s blatantly dishonest, and if one agrees with the premise that these are intelligent human beings, it is hard to come to any other conclusion than that these people are diabolical bastards. They would rather doom future generations to a lower standard of living and back-breaking debt than discuss economic realities that threaten their ideology.

The sad thing is, there are tens-of-millions of Americans who will buy the Trumka line that “Bain-style vultures” are what doomed Hostess. I would argue that the truth is something more akin to “San Bernardino-style vultures.”

The city’s decades-long journey from prosperous, middle-class community to bankrupt, crime-ridden, foreclosure-blighted basket case is straightforward — and alarmingly similar to the path traveled by many municipalities around America’s largest state. San Bernardino succumbed to a vicious circle of self-interests among city workers, local politicians and state pension overseers.

Little by little, over many years, the salaries and retirement benefits of San Bernardino’s city workers — and especially its police and firemen — grew richer and richer, even as the city lost its major employers and gradually got poorer and poorer.

$16 trillion. $17 trillion. $18 trillion. $19 trillion. $20 trillion. At what point will the economic “big one” occur? The fault lines are obvious. The ground is rumbling. And yet, the American people just re-elected a guy who is willfully downplaying the seismometer readings. If you haven’t been practicing, get ready to duck and cover.

I went to Target after dinner tonight to see if there were any Twinkies left. Sadly, the shelves were picked over. Somewhere, there is a zombie apocalypse bomb shelter that is stocked to the hilt with Twinkies. See you on the other side, Twinkie the Kid. I’ll see you on the other side… (Sniff.)
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About the Author Douglas Ernst

I'm a former Army guy who believes success comes through hard work, honesty, optimism, and perseverance. I believe seeing yourself as a victim creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. I believe in God. I'm a USC Trojan with an MA in Political Science from American University.

10 comments

    1. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment, Ryan. It’s nice to see that there are some young people out there fighting for the principles of our nation’s founding.

  1. and it will be bought, some will stay on, and capitalism will keep chugging forward. Doug, will your next post slam the greedy Walmart workers?

    1. Actually, I was eating in Panera tonight right next to Walmart strikers! They were incredibly … not worth writing about. I felt like telling them to just quit their job if they thought it was so miserable.

      In full disclosure, I worked the overnight shift at Target for a few years, so I’m partial to them. I know that they’re cleaner because … I scrubbed every square inch of the store down myself. And when it was time to move on to bigger and better things, I did.

  2. But where to run? How do we escape these brainless drones who elect dictators and influence others with lies? Cession? I’d like that but we still have Libs and Dems who vote for insane laws then run to conservative states for asylum from the effect and still try to implement those same laws elsewhere. Idiots!

    1. Well, I don’t think breaking up the Union is the answer. However, the Declaration of Independence has been on my mind a lot over the past few years:

      “But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

      When do we know when we’ve reached that point? It’s a good question. I don’t believe we’re there, but I do believe the financial house of cards will fall. There is no other option. It’s basic math.

      I’m actually turning over a few strategies in my head right now on how to win this fight, but I need to do more research. Here’s a good metaphor for what I think can be done. In essence, we can give the federal government a “brachial stun” by targeting certain pressure points of the administrative state.

  3. Question, so what are we supposed to do? Sit back and let companies do whatever it is they want? Are workers not supposed to have a voice?

    1. Workers have a voice. Unfortunately, you seem to equate “a voice” with “getting what they want, even if it is economically untenable.”

      If you looked into this, you’d realize that the Teamsters realized they pushed it as far as they could go, and wanted a deal — but the Bakers’ Union pulled the rug out from underneath them. They “bit off more than they could chew.” Bad pun intended.

      I also find it interesting that someone who obviously cares about being heard would post anonymously. I understand that you might have legitimate reasons for doing so … but it’s still humorous.

  4. The Wal-Mart workers should just quit if they think things are so bad. They don’t want to work on holidays? Join the club. I’ve worked on holidays before, like Halloween, the Fourth and on New Year’s. Sure, I didn’t WANT to be there, but I was just glad I was getting paid and that I had a job. The protesters should just deal with it. As for holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas, I always took those off in advance.

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